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  • Source: Educational Psychology
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  • Journal Articles

    1. Job characteristics and teacher well-being: The mediation of teacher self-monitoring and teacher self-efficacy
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Educational Psychology, 39(3), 313-331, 2019
    Year published: 2019
    Publisher: Routledge
    Teacher well-being is a critical factor affecting job performance and thus, significant for enhancing quality teaching. Based on the job demands-resources model, this study examines the mediating effects of teachers' self-monitoring and self-efficacy on the relationships between the emotional job demands of teaching and trust in colleagues and teacher well-being. A questionnaire was administered to 1115 primary school teachers in Hong Kong. The results highlight the maladaptive role of self-monitoring as a personal demand and the adaptive role of self-efficacy as a personal resource: self-monitoring is positively related to anxiety and depression; self-efficacy is positively related to enthusiasm and contentment and negatively related to anxiety and depression. The results not only support the beneficial role of trust in colleagues, which is positively associated with teacher self-efficacy and well-being, but also reveal the rewarding side of emotional job demands in enhancing teacher self-efficacy. Theoretical contributions and practical implications are discussed.
    [Copyright of Educational Psychology is the property of Routledge.]
  • Journal Articles

    2. Predicting primary students' self-regulated learning by their prior achievement, interest, personal best goal orientation and teacher feedback
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Educational Psychology, 2018
    Year published: 2018
    Publisher: Routledge
    Self-regulated learning (SRL) is of great importance to academic achievement and life-long learning. This study aimed to examine the prediction of three processes of primary students' SRL using students' prior achievement, interest in mathematics, personal best goal orientation, and their perceptions of teachers' feedback one academic year earlier. The SRL processes were planning, monitoring, and adaptive reactions. The sample comprised 2972 (1608 females and 1364 males) primary school students in Hong Kong. Multi-level path analysis determined that prior achievement, interest in mathematics, personal best goal orientation, and feedback predicted students' planning, monitoring, and adaptive reactions after one academic year, with interest and personal best goal orientation being the strongest predictors. Strategies for promoting interest in mathematics and developing personal best goal orientation among primary school students are discussed in the article. Copyright © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
  • Journal Articles

    3. Academic dishonesty among Hong Kong secondary school students: Application of theory of planned behaviour
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Educational Psychology, 38(7), 945-963, 2018
    Year published: 2018
    Publisher: Routledge
    The theory of planned behaviour was used to examine academic dishonesty among secondary school students in Hong Kong. Participants were 386 students in Forms 1-3 (Grades 7-9). Attitudes toward cheating, perceived behavioural control, and moral obligation were positively related to the intention to cheat, but only the subjective norm against cheating was significantly related to self-reported cheating behaviour. The subjective norm was both a predictor of self-reported cheating and a moderator of the relationship between the intention to cheat and self-reported cheating: the intention predicted the behaviour only when the subjective norm against cheating was perceived to be weak.
    [Copyright of Educational Psychology is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01443410.2018.1454588]
  • Journal Articles

  • Journal Articles

    5. Maintaining the transfer of in-service teachers' training in the workplace
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Educational Psychology, 36(3), 444-460, 2016
    Year published: 2016
    Publisher: Routledge
    Professional training and development is a major component of updating teachers' pedagogical knowledge and skills. However, transferring such knowledge and skill may not always be successful. Based on the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), the present study has developed a model specifying the factors affecting transfer maintenance intention and behaviour. This model was tested with the partial least square approach to structural equation modelling. The results indicate that the TPB-oriented model is able to explain in-service teachers' intention to maintain what they have learned from training in their jobs and their subsequent transfer maintenance behaviour. Moreover, the β coefficients indicate that attitude towards the behaviour was the major predictor of transfer maintenance intention, which was in turn the major predictor of transfer maintenance behaviour. Finally, research implications and practical implications have been provided in this study.
    [Copyright of Educational Psychology is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01443410.2015.1011608]
  • Journal Articles

    6. Exploring Asian students' citizenship values and their relationship to civic knowledge and school participation
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Educational Psychology, 33(3), 233-254, 2013
    Year published: 2013
    Publisher: Routledge
    Empirical evidence of Asian students' traditional citizenship values was provided in the Asian Regional Module (ARM) of the International Civic and Citizenship Study. This paper is based on a secondary analysis of the ARM data. Three issues are addressed. First, a theoretical analysis of the ARM constructs contributes to their construct validity. Second, the endorsement of these constructs by students from five Asian societies is compared indicating that some of the differences between societies were statistically significant, although effect sizes were generally weak or moderate. Third, the predictive validity of the constructs was examined. They had a small but differential effect on students' civic knowledge and a generally negligible effect on school participation. Variance at school and individual level accounted for by the ARM constructs differed across societies. The implications of these results for civic education and future research in the field are discussed.
    [Copyright of Educational Psychology is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01443410.2013.775003]
  • Journal Articles

    7. Learning strategies and their relationships to academic performance of high school students in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Educational Psychology, 33(7), 817-827, 2013
    Year published: 2013
    Publisher: Routledge
    The present study examines the dynamic relationship between academic performance of high school students and their respective learning and study strategies. Two hundred thirty-six high school students were recruited to participate in this study by completing a Chinese version of the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory - LASSI, to probe into the relationship. Results found that (1) there were clear differences to the learning and study strategies used by high school students with high academic performance, and those with low academic performance; (2) all the three components (Will; Self-regulation and Skill) were equally important to differentiate high academic achieving high school students from low academic achieving high school students within the strategic model of learning; and (3) a numbers of learning and study strategies were effectively predicting the academic performance of the high school students. All of these result patterns confirm that learning and study strategies used by high academic achievers and low academic achievers as well as the components used to predict students' academic performance in the high school setting are quite different from the patterns revealed in the tertiary education sector.
    [Copyright of Educational Psychology is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01443410.2013.794493]
  • Journal Articles

    8. Does big-fish-little-pond effect always exist? Investigation of goal orientations as moderators in the Hong Kong context
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Educational Psychology, 34(5), 561-580, 2014
    Year published: 2014
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis Ltd
    The big-fish-little-pond effect (BFLPE) posits that students with the same ability will have higher academic self-concepts when they are in low-ability classes than in high-ability classes. Our research puts the BFLPE under scrutiny by examining goal orientations as the moderators that may affect the size of the BFLPE. We collected data on mathematics self-concept, mathematics ability and goal orientation from 7334 Hong Kong junior secondary school students in 201 classes. We hypothesised that the BFLPE would be exacerbated for students who endorsed high extrinsic goals while the BFLPE would be attenuated for students who endorsed high intrinsic goals. However, the results did not fully support the hypothesis. We found that students who were highly motivated in general (both intrinsic and extrinsic) experienced stronger BFLPE. The implications of the findings are discussed.
    Copyright of Educational Psychology is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd.
  • Journal Articles

    9. Chinese mindset: Theories of intelligence, goal orientation and academic achievement in Hong Kong students
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Educational Psychology, 1-12, 2014
    Year published: 2014
    Publisher: Routledge
    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between theories of intelligence and goal orientations, and their joint connections to students' academic achievement in the Chinese cultural context. A total of 418 university students in Hong Kong participated in the present study. The survey was administered to collect information on students' beliefs about their goal orientations, theories of intelligence and their college grade point averages. The data were analysed using structural equation modelling. The results suggest that beliefs in the incremental theory of intelligence contribute to students' academic achievements by facilitating their endorsement of mastery goals and performance-approach goals. Students' performance-avoidance goals have a negative association with academic success. Cultural factors and considerations are addressed to clarify further the culture-specific findings.
    [Copyright of Educational Psychology is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01443410.2014.893559]
  • Journal Articles

    10. Identification of the patterns of Chinese character recognition in students with learning disabilities requiring Tier-2 support: A Rasch analysis
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Educational Psychology, 34(3), 305-322, 2014
    Year published: 2014
    Publisher: Routledge
    This study investigates the Chinese reading patterns of students with learning disabilities (LD). The performances of students with LD in reading the three categories of Chinese characters were particularly analysed: regular, irregular, and pseudo-characters. Fifty-three students with LD in reading and 44 students without LD of Year 4 were selected from five Hong Kong primary schools. Their abilities for reading Chinese characters were measured using Rasch analysis. Both types of students found regular characters as the easiest to read. Students without LD showed better performance in reading irregular characters than pseudo-characters, whereas students with LD exhibited no significant performance difference in reading these two categories. The implication of these results is that the students without LD might rely on using the orthographic processing than that of phonological processing to read. On the other hand, students with LD might not have the preference of using the orthographic processing.
    [Copyright of Educational Psychology is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01443410.2013.785060]
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