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  • Journal Articles

    51. Computer-mediated composition pedagogy: Students’ engagement and learning in popular music and classical music
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Music Education Research, 2020
    Year published: 2020
    Publisher: Routledge
    This study examined 44 students’ engagement in the composition of popular and classical music in a computer-mediated environment. The study took place over the course of one school year at a government-funded secondary school in Hong Kong that had 30 iMac music workstations. Participants were 22 Form 3 students (aged 14–15) and 22 Form 4 students (aged 15–16) who composed in different genres consisting of popular music styles and classical music styles (i.e. baroque, classical and romantic period music), respectively, on the computer as part of the school’s music curriculum. At the end of the study, participants completed a retrospective assessment to examine the correlation between engagement in music learning and computer-mediated composition. The results indicated three areas that should be considered in music curriculum development: 1) sustainable engagement in learning both classical and popular music; and 2) the idea of ‘de-composing’ and ‘re-composing’ pedagogy in both classical and popular music styles. The findings suggest that ‘de-composing’ and ‘re-composing’ pedagogy in computer-mediated composition may engage students in ways that promote deeper learning by combining ‘old’ and ‘new’ musical styles through an engagement cycle that enhances an understanding of both classical and popular music. Copyright © 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
  • Journal Articles

    52. Factors affecting secondary students' enjoyment of English private tutoring: Student, family, teacher, and tutoring
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Year published: 2020
    Publisher: Springer
    In many Asian countries and increasingly in the West, primary and secondary school students receive private tutoring, often in the form of lectures in cram schools. As English is an international lingua franca, many students enroll in English courses after school. Students enrolled in English private tutoring (EPT) are often examination-driven and extrinsically motivated to learn English, but past studies have not examined whether they like EPT lessons. Hence, we integrate motivation and tutoring into a theoretical model of EPT enjoyment at different levels (student, family, teacher, tutoring) and empirically test it with the survey responses of 543 Secondary Six (Grade 12) students enrolled in EPT courses in cram schools. The findings show that most Secondary Six students in Hong Kong like EPT lessons. Family, reasons for tutoring, tutoring, and student attributes are linked to EPT enjoyment. These students are more likely to like EPT if they (a) are in families perceived to have superior financial resources, (b) are not influenced by advertisements or other people to join EPT lessons, (c) attend face-to-face tutoring, (d) have a specific tutor, (e) like the tutor more than their teachers, (f) are interested in English, or (g) have greater English self-concept. The results of this study can contribute to our understanding of which motivation and tutoring factors affect students' enjoyment of EPT and inform EPT improvements. Copyright © 2020 De La Salle University.
  • Journal Articles

    53. Using public exam questions in fishbowl debate to engage exam-oriented students in communicative language teaching
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: RELC Journal, 2020
    Year published: 2020
    Publisher: Sage Publications Ltd.
    This article introduces the use of public exam questions in fishbowl debate to engage highly exam-oriented secondary students with communicative language teaching (CLT). The practice aims to address the issue that many teachers of English as a second language (ESL)/English as a foreign language (EFL) in Asian contexts either teach to the test or implement CLT without catering for the students' pragmatic needs to pass external assessment. A series of activities was implemented in a secondary school in Hong Kong to promote positive washback from the public exam. The author's experience and reflections informed by ongoing dialogue with the stakeholders in the school and data collected from student focus group interviews suggest that the fishbowl debate encouraged students to use English for authentic and meaningful purposes, while appreciating its relevance to the writing exam. An important pedagogical implication is for teachers to balance CLT and exam preparation and help students to reach both their mastery and performance goals. Copyright © 2020 The Author(s).
  • Journal Articles

    54. ELL's science meaning making in multimodal inquiry: A case-study in a Hong Kong bilingual school
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia-Pacific Science Education, 5(0), 1-35, 2019
    Year published: 2019
    Publisher: SpringerOpen
    This paper reports on a multimodal teaching approach delivered to grade 5 elementary students in a bilingual school in Hong Kong, as part of a larger research study aimed at supporting English Language Learners (ELLs) in science class. As language demands of reading, writing and talking science place additional challenges on ELLs, there is much research interest in exploring the use of multiple modes of communication beyond the dominant use of verbal and written language. Research has shown that students develop a better scientific understanding of natural phenomena by using and alternating between a variety of representations. Yet, questions remain as to what meanings ELLs make during a multimodal discourse and, in turn, how such discourse provides support to ELLs in learning science. Drawing on social semiotics, which theorizes language as a meaning making resource comprising a range of modes (e.g. gestures and diagrams), we used a case-study approach to examine how a multimodal instructional approach provided 10 students with multiple avenues to make sense of science learning. Video recordings (capturing gestures, speech and model manipulation) and student works (drawing and writing) were collected during nine inquiry science lessons, which encompassed biology, physics and chemistry science units. Multimodal transcription allowed discourse to be analysed at a fine-grain level which, together with analysis of student works, indicated that the multimodal instructional approach provided the necessary inquiry opportunities and variety of language experiences for ELLs to build science understandings. Analysis also revealed how the affordances of modes attributed to the meaning making potentials for the ELLs and how they provided alternate communication avenues in which new meanings could be made. The findings from this study have implications for ELLs learning science within the growing multilingual Asia-Pacific region.
    [Copyright of Asia-Pacific Science Education
  • Journal Articles

    55. Seeing flowers through the mist: How social workers in disability services retrospectively view their educational experiences related to case management in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: China Journal of Social Work, 12(1), 39-55, 2019
    Year published: 2019
    Publisher: Routledge
    This article is principally designed to examine social workers' retrospective views on their past educational experiences with case management in disability services to supply a deficiency that very little literature attention has been paid to how prior professional education shape their case management practice. Using qualitative methods, 13 social workers selected by purposive sampling were invited to participate in in-depth interviews. The qualitative data were analysed to generate some themes. Three themes found are "from 'rarely heard of it' to 'remember it being referred to'"; "buy a lottery ticket before starting a field placement"; and "Ambiguity". These themes indicate that social work education related to case management was lagging behind, which may exacerbate social work's polarisation and lead to social workers' confusion about their professionality. As a result, an urgent need for greater knowledge of case management in university education and in-service training should be addressed in Hong Kong.
    [Copyright of China Journal of Social Work is the property of Routledge.]
  • Journal Articles

    56. The effect of first and second language use on question types in English medium instruction science classrooms in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Year published: 2019
    Publisher: Routledge
    The role of the first language (L1) in second language (L2) learning has been widely discussed and researched in the second Language Acquisition (SLA) literature. Benefits of L1 use have been found for vocabulary acquisition, and in facilitating comprehension thereby alleviating student anxiety. Many teachers appear to consider L1 use as a necessary option in L2 pedagogy. Disadvantages of L1 use are argued to be that it reduces exposure to the L2 thereby not enabling more implicit forms of L2 acquisition. Considerably less research has been carried out in English medium instruction (EMI) classrooms, surprisingly, as these are predicated on the benefits of massive exposure to the L2. This study investigated the effect of L1 and L2 use on teacher question types and interaction patterns in science lessons in early EMI and late EMI schools in Hong Kong. Our findings show that in late EMI, where there was much greater use of the L1, teachers tended to use higher order questions and were more interactive. In early EMI, despite students having received four more years of greater exposure to English instruction than late EMI students through the use of English as the vehicular language, teachers asked lower order questions and the interaction was more monologic. The implications for policy and pedagogy are discussed.
    [Copyright of International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism is the property of Routledge.]
  • Journal Articles

    57. Adoption of flipped learning in social humanities education: The FIBER experience in secondary schools
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Interactive Learning Environments, 27(8), 1222-1238, 2019
    Year published: 2019
    Publisher: Routledge
    FIBER (Flipped Issue-Based Enquiry Ride) is a teacher-facilitated interactive pedagogic framework that the authors propose to integrate flipped learning into social humanities education. This paper reports a quasi-experimental study (with mixed methods) which examined the pedagogic effectiveness of FIBER in the authentic setting of formal curriculum learning and teaching. The study involved totally 611 Secondary-4 students from academically top, middle and bottom schools in Hong Kong. In comparison with the conventional issue-based enquiry learning approach, FIBER had different intensity of positive effects on the high, moderate, and low academic-achieving student participants. This paper provides researchers and educational practitioners with empirical evidence for supporting wider adoption of FIBER in social humanities education, as well as harnessing flipped learning in formal schooling. Apart from discussing the benefits, the authors also underline the challenges of FIBER and suggest future work.
    [Copyright of Interactive Learning Environments is the property of Routledge.]
  • Journal Articles

    58. Curriculum genres and task structure as frameworks to analyse teachers' use of L1 in CBI classrooms
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Year published: 2019
    Publisher: Routledge
    Content-based education programmes, in which a second/foreign language (L2) is used as the medium of instruction when teaching non-language content subjects, aim at both content and L2 learning. With such dual goal in mind, and with the rapid expansion of the programmes to contexts where students might have only basic L2 proficiency, there have been consistent calls for reconsidering the roles of first language (L1) in the teaching and learning process. The functions of L1 in content-based classrooms have been well documented, but it is necessary to have a more systematic approach to planning and using L1. This paper seeks to address this gap by applying the notions of 'curriculum genres' and 'task structure' when analysing patterns of teachers' use of L1 and L2 in a collection of content subject lessons observed in English-medium secondary schools in Hong Kong. With illustrative episodes presented in this paper, we would argue that 'curriculum genres' and 'task structure' can serve as useful tools for both researchers and teachers to analyse and critically reflect on patterns of pedagogic practices and language use in content-based classrooms. These will have significant implications for future research on using L1 and illuminate effective pedagogy in content-based education.
    [Copyright of International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism is the property of Routledge.]
  • Journal Articles

    59. Hong Kong senior secondary students' reading motivation and classical Chinese reading comprehension
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Year published: 2019
    Publisher: Springer Netherlands
    This study investigated Hong Kong secondary students' Classical Chinese (CC) reading comprehension, reading motivation, and the effects of different types of motivation on CC reading. Four hundred forty-eight seniors from four secondary schools in Hong Kong voluntarily completed a CC reading comprehension test and a reading motivation questionnaire. Findings indicated that students' CC reading performance was unsatisfactory. They had poor self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation in CC reading and read CC texts mainly for extrinsic reasons. While high-achievers had better CC reading comprehension performance and higher extrinsic motivation than low-achievers, they had lower intrinsic motivation. Unlike many previous studies in which intrinsic motivation has been found to be the most optimal type of reading motivation, structural equation modeling indicated that only self-efficacy and extrinsic motivation were significant predictors of students' CC reading comprehension performance after controlling for achievement level. The relation between CC reading and different types of motivation is discussed in light of the special nature of CC and the learning context of Hong Kong.
    [Copyright of Reading and Writing: An Interdisciplinary Journal is the property of Springer Netherlands.]
  • Dissertation Theses

    60. 內地與香港初中中國歷史教科書課文輔助系統比較研究
    By: 高萍
    Document Type: Dissertation Theses
    Year published: 2019
    歷史教科書的結構可以分為課文系統和課文輔助系統兩部分。課文系統是教科書的主體內容,課文輔助系統則起到工具性的作用,兩者都是教科書必不可少的組成部分。目前,學術界在教科書比較研究方面,關於內地和香港中國歷史教科書課文系統的研究成果較多,因而本文從課文輔助系統角度,對兩地初中中國歷史教科書進行比較分析。本文以香港雅集版和內地部編版初中中國歷史教科書為例,將兩版教科書進行分析和比較,以此深化對課文輔助系統的認知與理解。除緒論和結語外,文章總共分為四章內容:第一章內容為兩版初中中國歷史教科書導學系統的比較。本文從編輯說明、目錄和課前提要等方面,比較兩版教科書導學系統的異同點。總體而言,雅集版導學系統生動有趣,部編版則簡明扼要。第二章內容是兩版初中中國歷史教科書闡釋系統的比較。對兩版教科書闡釋系統進行比較,主要選取了文獻資料、注釋和圖表資料等欄目。通過比較發現,雅集版的闡釋系統形式多樣,部編版則傾向於典型性和針對性。第三章主要是兩版初中中國歷史教科書鞏固拓展系統的比較。通過課內思考題、課後習題和拓展活動的分析,探討兩版教科書鞏固拓展系統的特點。雅集版鞏固拓展系統注重探究能力的培養,部編版側重基礎知識的掌握。第四章是對內地初中中國歷史教科書課文輔助系統教學和編寫的啟示。在比較分析的基礎上,學習香港雅集版課文輔助系統的優點,使歷史教師課堂教學更加完善,也希望對歷史教科書課文輔助系統的編寫有所啟發。
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