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  • Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education
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  • Journal Articles

    51. Homework involvement among Hong Kong primary school students
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 29(2), 213-227, 2009
    Year published: 2009
    Publisher: Routledge
    One component of the curriculum reform in Hong Kong focuses on the use of homework in consolidating learning, deepening understanding and constructing knowledge. This study examines the profile of Hong Kong primary school students' homework involvement, and investigates the relationships between time involvement and academic attributes, namely interest in homework, interest in academic subjects, academic efficacy, and efficacy for self-regulated learning. The sample comprised 2,361 primary school students representing all six grade levels in Hong Kong. Data was collected using questionnaires and homework diaries. Results showed heavy homework involvement among primary school students in Hong Kong, especially at the senior primary level. Differential patterns across levels were observed for the relationship between homework involvement and academic attributes. Specifically, junior primary students' study-related interests and efficacies were found to decline with increasing time involvement, whereas inverted U-shape relationships were observed among senior primary students. There was concern for students with high time involvement as they received more homework and they worked slower. They were less likely to perceive the positive functions of homework, and showed poorer study-related interests and efficacy beliefs. The findings of this study provide crucial information for school personnel and educators in Hong Kong in developing homework strategies and policies that enhance teaching and learning.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02188790902859004]
  • Journal Articles

    52. A re-examination of leadership style for Hong Kong school-based management (SBM) schools
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 26(2), 173-187, 2006
    Year published: 2006
    Publisher: Routledge
    Leadership style has always been a controversial topic in educational administration and management. Following the recommendation of the Education Commission to introduce school-based management (SBM) into Hong Kong schools in the early 1990s, discussions about the kind of leadership style that is appropriate for SBM schools have never ceased. The government holds a continuing belief that SBM schools work better if they are managed by "better" principals, and emphasises the value of "transformational leadership." However, this paper articulates the limitations of that leadership style and argues for complementing it with "educational leadership," which purports that principals have an obligation to learn with others about ways of promoting student learning. Secondly, the staff should also be encouraged and helped to carry out certain leadership functions. These arguments are supported by references to the most relevant literature. The discussion is useful to school principals, leaders, and teachers by offering them a better understanding of how to facilitate the implementation of SBM.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02188790600937292]
  • Journal Articles

    53. Running universities as enterprises: University governance changes in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 27(3), 305-322, 2007
    Year published: 2007
    Publisher: Routledge
    University entrepreneurialism has been adopted as a way of promoting quality education in Hong Kong. In light of the role of the state in Hong Kong's changing higher education governance, this article critically reviews the rationale for privatising and corporatising the university sector. With a focus on the current trends of privatisation and corporatisation, the article discusses and examines how the entrepreneurial culture has changed university governance in Hong Kong and whether these changes have boosted Hong Kong's academic diversity, particularly when the Hong Kong government has set as its vision the promotion of the city as a regional hub of higher education.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02188790701591543]
  • Journal Articles

    54. Open attitudes, attribution beliefs, and knowledge of Hong Kong teacher interns in an era of education reform
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 28(2), 177-187, 2008
    Year published: 2008
    Publisher: Routledge
    We have investigated how open attitudes, attribution beliefs, pedagogical knowledge, and pedagogical content knowledge were related to teaching performance among teacher interns. The participants were 72 teacher interns in Hong Kong, where large-scale education reform has been launched since 2000. Multiple methods (self-report, academic grades, and ratings from mentors and supervisors) were used to measure the interns' attribution beliefs, open attitudes, pedagogical knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, and teaching performance. It was found that their openness to advice and challenges, effort attribution for failure, and pedagogical content knowledge were positively associated with their teaching performance in an era of education reform.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02188790802036661]
  • Journal Articles

    55. Making claims for school media: A study of teachers' beliefs about media in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 29(1), 1-15, 2009
    Year published: 2009
    Publisher: Routledge
    Despite growing calls for media education in different parts of the world, little consensus has been reached over what to teach and how to teach. The implementation of related initiatives varies across different contexts as well as cultures. The outcomes depend largely on the beliefs, attitudes and efforts of individual teachers. This study aims to identify and discuss teachers' beliefs about media through an analysis of documents related to school media. It examines how 13 secondary schools in Hong Kong justified their applications for funding to set up a school television station. Using methods in documentary research, the study analyses the claims made for school media. The hidden assumptions held by schools towards school media, new media, mass media, media education and media literacy are discussed.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02188790802655007]
  • Journal Articles

    56. Family effects on student achievement in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 26(1), 21-35, 2006
    Year published: 2006
    Publisher: Routledge
    We examine the effects of family structures and processes on student achievement in Hong Kong. Specifically, we show that the negative effects of single parenthood in past studies are not universal. In Hong Kong, 4,405 15-year-old students completed a questionnaire, and tests in reading, mathematics and science. We analysed the data using multilevel models of Rasch test scores and Warm estimated indices of questionnaire items. In all subjects, the scores of children living with single parents did not differ significantly from those of children living with two parents. Moreover, students living with no parents had lower reading and science scores than other students, and this effect was mediated by lower family investment and involvement.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02188790600607846]
  • Journal Articles

    57. Countability not answerability? Accountability in Hong Kong and Singapore universities
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 28(1), 67-85, 2008
    Year published: 2008
    Publisher: Routledge
    Singapore and Hong Kong are vying to be the principal educational hub for the Asia-Pacific region and have begun to compete with Australia, Britain, Canada and the USA in providing cross-border education. Although these four Anglo-American countries still dominate cross-border education, Singapore and Hong Kong hope to make inroads into this export market and compete on the global stage. To create "world-class" universities, Singapore and Hong Kong have introduced quality assurance mechanisms, diversified funding sources, and restructured their university governance systems. This article compares the accountability measures introduced into Hong Kong and Singapore universities, and the responses of academics and administrators to these measures. The results indicate that both countries introduced greater autonomy as they augmented accountability for their universities, and the term "decentralised centralism" describes the kind of government control exerted in these Asian universities in the twenty-first century.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02188790701845972]
  • Journal Articles

    58. Challenges to values education in Hong Kong school music education
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 26(2), 225-241, 2006
    Year published: 2006
    Publisher: Routledge
    This study deals with the issue of incorporating values education in music education in Hong Kong's primary and secondary schools. It includes the development of the state's cultural and national identity since its handover from the United Kingdom to the People's Republic of China (PRC). Thirty primary and secondary school music teachers were interviewed in order to understand how notions of "musical values" and "non-musical values" have been addressed in the curriculum. In particular, this study focuses on music teachers' perspectives on teaching world music, traditional Chinese music, the PRC national anthem, and non-musical values. This paper questions the effectiveness of existing curricular and pedagogical attempts to encourage the students' musical experience and extra-musical education. It concludes that values education must have clear conceptions of "values", "musical cultures", and "national identity" in order to maintain unity amidst the intensifying plurality of ethnicities and cultures in Hong Kong.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02188790600937383]
  • Journal Articles

    59. A tale of two cities: Education responds to globalisation in Hong Kong and Singapore in the aftermath of the Asian Economic crisis
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 23(1), 43-68, 2003
    Year published: 2003
    Publisher: Routledge
    It has been suggested that although the most theorisation about globalisation has emerged from western contexts, the material implications of globalisation have been felt most strongly in non- Western regions. With this in mind, the authors undertake a situated analysis of how two states, Singapore and Hong Kong, are interacting with the broader processes of globalisation through their educational policies. Foucault's conceptual tool of governmentality is used to understand (i) the conduct of governing in the contemporary nation- state, and (ii) how the right rationalities are being inculcated by government to create desiring subjects who will play their part in ensuring national prosperity. The Asian economic crisis is used as a point of departure to show how global local tensions are being managed by Singapore and Hong Kong. The article concludes that both these global cities have adroitly managed the Asian economic crisis to steer their citizens away from pursuits of greater political freedom and towards concerns of material well being. They have done so through a selective interpretation of globalisation, by simultaneously resisting and embracing the contradictory strands of globalisation. Education has emerged as a critical space for this selective absorption of globalising trends.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0218879030230104 ]
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