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  • Journal Articles

    1. Destigmatizing psychosis: Investigating the effectiveness of a school-based programme in Hong Kong secondary school students
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Early Intervention In Psychiatry, 13(4), 882-887, 2019
    Year published: 2019
    Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
    Aim: Although the reasons behind the stigmatization of psychosis are manifold, poor mental health literacy among the general public is likely to be a major factor. In Hong Kong, the Early Psychosis Foundation (EPISO) was established in 2007 to tackle this issue by providing educational and mental health promotional activities, among other aims and services. The current study evaluated the effectiveness of a school-based interventional programme, the School Tour, developed by EPISO.; Methods: The School Tour differentiates itself from other interventional programmes by supplementing a traditional psychoeducational talk with 2 additional elements: an engaging drama performance and exercise demonstrations. Twelve secondary schools, with a total of 4520 students, participated in the study. Knowledge and attitudes towards psychosis were evaluated before and after the school programme.; Results: The School Tour was found to improve both students' knowledge of psychosis (P < .001) and their attitude (P < .001) towards the illness.; Conclusions: Its effectiveness in reducing the stigma towards psychosis validates the use of novel strategies like drama performances to engage adolescent students, and urges the government to support increased student participation in the programme by providing funding to the relevant organizations.
    [Copyright of Early Intervention In Psychiatry is the property of Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia.]
  • Conference Papers

    2. Enhancing positive emotions and reducing negative emotions of Chinese university students: An exploratory intervention study in a general education course
    By: Yang, Lan
    Document Type: Conference Papers
    Conference: The 9th European Conference on Positive Psychology: Positive psychology for a flourishing Europe in times of transitions (2018: ELTE Conference Center, Budapest, Hungary)
    Background: Although an increasing body of research shows the positive relationships between positive achievement emotions (enjoyment and hope) and students’ learning strategies, and academic achievement, the majority of studies were cross-sectional in nature and typically conducted in Western countries[Pekrun, 2006,; Pekrun, Goetz, Frenzel, Barchfeld, & Perry, 2011; Pekrun, Lichtenfeld, Marsh, Murayama, & Goetz, 2017].Aim: This study extended previous achievement emotions to a sample of Chinese university students by using an experimental design.Method: An intervention approach termed Team-based Learning (TBL) was implemented in four sessions of a general education breath course in Hong Kong Chinese students. Two classes of students were involved (N=80). One class was treated as experimental, the other was control.Results: The results showed that TBL produced significantly positive effects on enhancing students’ positive emotions (learning-related enjoyment and hope), meanwhile significantly reducing students’ negative emotions (learning-related boredom and anxiety) in the experimental class. In the control class, both enjoyment and hope increased, while both boredom and anxiety decreased. However, these changes of emotions in the control class were not significant.Conclusions: TBL may be a promising intervention approach to promote university students’ emotional well-being in terms of their learning-related emotions. Further research by increasing sample size and expanding to other courses and groups is needed. Copyright © 2018 ECPP.
  • Journal Articles

    3. Learning how to make friends for Chinese adolescents with autism spectrum disorder: A randomized controlled trial of the Hong Kong Chinese version of the peers® intervention
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Year published: 2018
    Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
    This study examined the treatment efficacy of PEERS®; (Program for the Education and Enrichment of Relational Skills) among Chinese adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in Hong Kong. The original PEERS®; manual was translated into Chinese, and cultural adjustments were made according to a survey among 209 local adolescents in the general population. 72 high-functioning adolescents with ASD were randomly assigned to a treatment or waitlist control group. The 14-week parent-assisted training significantly improved social skills knowledge and social functioning, and also reduced autistic mannerisms. Treatment outcomes were maintained for 3 months after training and replicated in the control group after delayed treatment. The present study represents one of the few randomized controlled trials on PEERS® conducted outside North America.
    [Copyright of Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders is the property of Springer Science & Business Media. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-018-3728-1]
  • Journal Articles

    4. A cyberbullying intervention for Hong Kong Chinese college students
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Year published: 2017
    Publisher: Springer Netherlands
    A cyberbullying intervention was developed and empirically tested with 137 Hong Kong Chinese College students. The intervention was designed to change students’ attitudes about cyberbullying behavior and increase their awareness of cyberbullying. Participants were assigned to an experimental or control group. They completed questionnaires before the intervention (Time 1; T1), immediately after the intervention (Time 2; T2), and again eight weeks later (Time 3; T3). The experimental group participated in a 1-h intervention where they were presented with a simulated Facebook page showing the helpless feelings of cyber-victims, watched video clips of the consequences of cyberbullying, and engaged in small group discussions and a self-reflection writing task. Results showed that participants who received the intervention experienced an increase in their awareness and had more negative attitudes toward cyberbullying (i.e., the perception that cyberbullying is unacceptable behavior) than did the control group. In addition, those who reported being highly engaged in the intervention maintained the positive effects at the 8-week follow-up. The results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of a short-term cyberbullying intervention for college students and that level of participant engagement contributes to its effectiveness.
    [Copyright © 2017 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. and The International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies (ISQOLS).]
  • Journal Articles

    5. Hong Kong secondary school students' attitudes towards science: A study of structural models and gender differences
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: International Journal of Science Education, 39(5), 507-527, 2017
    Year published: 2017
    Publisher: Routledge
    This study explored two under-researched areas on students' attitudes towards science, that is, the structural models representing these attitudes and the role played by school bands in moderating the gender differences in such attitudes. The participants were 360 ninth graders in Hong Kong from 3 school bands. The structural equation modelling method was adopted to compare four hypothetical models for students' attitudes towards science. Results reflect that (i) the data supported the three-factor structure of the behavioural domain of students' attitudes towards science; (ii) the four lower level dimensions of the attitudes towards science (i.e. value of science to society, self-concept in science, anxiety towards science and enjoyment of science) could be further integrated into broader categories; (iii) male students demonstrated significantly more positive attitudes towards science in five dimensions (i.e. self-concept in science, enjoyment in science, learning science in and outside the classroom and future participation) and (iv) school bands played a prominent moderating role in gender differences in students' attitudes towards science. Implications for studying and developing students' attitudes towards science are discussed in the paper.
  • Conference Papers

    6. Understanding Chinese students with dyslexia: From basic research to intervention
    Document Type: Conference Papers
    Year published: 2009
    Conference: Redesigning Pedagogy International Conference: Designing New Learning Contexts for a Globalising World, National Institute of Education (2009: Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)
    Dyslexia has received increasing professional and public awareness in Hong Kong over the past decade. The goal of understanding dyslexia is to provide effective prevention and remediation programs possible in order to ameliorate the disabling effects of the conditions. Students with dyslexia are often characterized by significant difficulties in reading and spelling despite access to conventional teaching and adequate formal education. Systematic evidence-based approaches to identify, assess and support have been developing and researching. First the core concepts of dyslexia: its definition, prevalence and developmental course are reviewed. Next the cognitive characteristics of dyslexia and its manifestations in Chinese students are discussed. To date the preponderance of reading interventions that might be used within a response-to-intervention (RTI) framework are also addressed.
  • Journal Articles

  • Journal Articles

    8. A school-based rope skipping intervention for adolescents in Hong Kong: Protocol of a matched-pair cluster randomized controlled trial
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: BMC Public Health, 14, 535-535, 2014
    Year published: 2014
    Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd
    Background: Schools present venues for physical activity promotion among youth, with physical education (PE) considered the primary vehicle responsible for increasing activity levels. Yet students are not very physically active during typical school PE classes. With the aim to engage Hong Kong students in more moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during PE, a fitness infusion intervention using rope skipping was designed, and its effectiveness will be examined. Rope skipping was chosen because a) it provides moderate-to-high intensity physical activity; b) is inexpensive; c) students find it enjoyable; and d) is feasible in typical environments in Hong Kong, where PE classes are large in size (up to 40 students) and space available for physical activity is usually limited. Methods/Design: A matched-pair cluster randomized controlled trial was designed. Secondary school students from 24 classes (from 12 schools) will be recruited to participate in the trial. Students' baseline MVPA will be measured during school PE. Classes will be matched according to baseline variables and one class from each pair will be randomized into the experimental group. Teachers in the experimental group will be invited to attend a teacher workshop, and will insert a 15-minute rope skipping activity in four consecutive PE lessons. Motivational factors based on self-determination theory will also be measured as secondary outcomes. The effectiveness of the intervention will be evaluated by comparing changes in the proportion of lesson time spent in MVPA from baseline to follow-up across the experimental and control groups. Discussion: Physical activity levels in PE are often very low and there is a need to identify feasible low-cost interventions that can be easily disseminated. If the results of the study suggest the intervention to be effective, it could be implemented to schools throughout Hong Kong and other cities where space is limited.
    [Copyright of Bmc Public Health is the
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