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  • Conference Papers

    1. Promoting cultural responsiveness and multicultural competency in Hong Kong schools
    Document Type: Conference Papers
    Conference: 21st Annual Children’s Identity and Citizenship European Association Conference (CiCea 2019): Europe at a Crossroads: Rights, Values and Identity (2019: Charles University, Karolinum, Czech)
    This presentation explores acculturation and identity of ethnic minority students in Hong Kong schools, and how they are associated to their learning needs in schools and to what extend culturally responsive classroom environment has been created for fulfilling their diverse learning and cultural needs. This study was qualitative in nature. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in three secondary schools where large numbers of ethnic minority students from low socio-economic backgrounds were enrolled. With school permission, thirty-two teachers were invited to attend one-on-one interviews. Eighteen were female and 14 were male. The enrolment of ethnic minority students was regarded by the teachers as one of the key factors which made the classroom more diverse and multicultural, with the range of diversity covering race, culture, religion, customs and socioeconomic background. When fulfilling their students’ needs, the teachers struggled with conceptualizing a new rationale for cultural responsiveness to diversity, developing intercultural sensitivity, promoting cultural responsiveness among the students, strengthening the home-school collaboration and broadening ethnic minority students’ aspirations for their education and careers. Copyright © 2019 CiCea.
  • Conference Papers

    2. A language-informed case study approach to elucidate the intersections of race, ethnicity policy, and power
    Document Type: Conference Papers
    Conference: American Educational Research Association (AERA) 2019 Annual Meeting (2019: Metro Toronto Convention Centre, Toronto, Canada)
    This paper provides a critical re-examination of prevailing case study approaches that select ethnic minority cases based on racial identities. It revisits the importance of distinguishing between concepts of ‘race’ and ‘ethnicity’ (Brubaker, 2004 Wallerstein, 1991), and proposes a language-informed approach to reconceptualize these constructs in view of the power dynamics that results in their conflation.I examine the language developments that structure the school context to highlight the power dynamics of Hong Kong’s shifting identity from special administrative region to its eventual integration into Mainland China. A language-informed approach provides an illustrative case of language developments that propel schools into the unintended consequence of enculturating Cantonese-speaking (Hong Kong) students to embrace Mandarin (Mainland). Language developments coalesce into a coherent strategy that elicits the voluntary cooperation of autonomous Hong Kong schools to conflate the race and ethnic identities of Mandarin and Cantonese-speaking students.Lexis Elementary is a school in Hong Kong located near the border of Mainland China. Due to poor school enrolment, it had a close-shave with school closure. The school survived by enrolling students from across the border from Mainland China, where the language is Mandarin rather than Cantonese spoken in Hong Kong. The consequence is a transformation in the school language profile. From juggling between English and Cantonese, Lexis Elementary students are now predominantly Mandarin speakers.The case study demonstrates how the economics of school survival coalesce with language developments to produce trickle-down effects on the conflation of race and ethnic identities. It highlights the need for language-informed case studies to chart the structural racism that underlie the complex webs race and ethnic identities entrenched in language development. I draw attention to how ethnic minorities are sequentially rendered invisible
  • Conference Papers

    3. Rereading structural racism and exclusion inside the policy
    By: Gao, Fang
    Document Type: Conference Papers
    Conference: American Educational Research Association (AERA) 2019 Annual Meeting (2019: Metro Toronto Convention Centre, Toronto, Canada)
    This paper elucidates a critical reading of language policies that uncovers its racial discourse arising from its intersection of power, equity and diversity, particularly the historical remnants and recent demographic changes in Asia. Home to Asia are a sizeable number of Confucian societies that respond differently to equity and diversity when compared to their Western counterparts. Underlying this response is the Confucian conception of social justice expressed through the idea of impartiality rather than equity (Kennedy, 2011). Such conception invites new challenges on striking a balance among supporting the ethnic identities, languages and cultures of minority groups and avoiding social separation and ethnic conflicts.In this paper, we turn to this challenge in Hong Kong, where Chinese language acquisition is a repeatedly reported concern of ethnic minorities in the local (government-funded) education system. We draw on two studies with ethnic minorities, their parents and teachers that involved a documentary analysis, interviews, and classroom observations. We particularly attend to the interests of the dominant group to unpack the nature of these language policies, several important factors related to complexity, contextuality, complicity, complementarity, and continuity of linguistic capital (Pennycook, 2000, p. 50).By plotting the continuity and transformation of language policies in the pre- and post-handover periods in Hong Kong, the emerging findings suggest how certain Confucian ideologies manifest in past and current policies and linguistic practices in education for ethnic minorities. The paper highlights conflicting educational expectations, policies and practices, revealing how centrism in educational intervention reflects the proclivity towards new-integrationist (assimilationist) approaches to cultural diversity (Gube & Gao, in press). The outcome can be a cultural condition that privileges impartiality and sameness.Going against the “grain” of such
  • Dissertation Theses

    4. A Hong Kong study of relationship between university students’ attribution styles and their attitudes towards seeking counselling help
    Document Type: Dissertation Theses
    Year published: 2018
    Hong Kong universities offer counselling services for students, but students often do not actively seek such services when they need them. This study used quantitative and qualitative methods to investigate the relationship between attribution styles, attitude and other factors that may affect university students’ use of counselling services. The study involved 292 student participants from Hong Kong. Overall, 279 students participated in the quantitative study, and 13 in the qualitative study. For the quantitative study, 56 participants (22 males; 34 females) were from University A and 223 (67 males; 156 females) were from University B. For the qualitative study, one participant (one female) was from University A and 12 participants (three males; nine females) was from University B. The Attributional Style Questionnaire (ASQ) and the Inventory of Attitudes Toward Seeking Mental Health Services (IASMHS) were used in the quantitative part of the current study. The ASQ was used to measure the attribution style of participants in three causal dimensions, including ‘Internality’, ‘Stability’ and ‘Globality’, and the IASMHS was used to measure the participants’ attitudes towards counselling help in three ways: ‘psychological openness’, ‘help-seeking propensity’ and ‘indifference to stigma’. Results from the quantitative study showed that girls had higher ‘indifference stigma’ in their attitudes towards counselling help than boys. Participants who had previously sought counselling help showed higher ‘psychological openness’ in their attitudes towards counselling help than those who did not. Moreover, the students’ study majors and religious beliefs were significant predictors for ‘psychological openness’ in multiple regressions. Participants’ responses in the qualitative study were systematically analysed under three main themes, including ‘Problems faced by university students’, ‘Self and others’ past experiences in seeking counselling help’ and ‘Students’ attitudes and perception
  • Book Chapters

    5. Views of parents on a career and life planning program for junior secondary students with special educational needs: A qualitative study in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Book Chapters
    Pages: 161-175
    Year published: 2020
    City published: Singapore
    Publisher: Springer
    Career and life planning is extremely important for all adolescents in order to enhance transition outcomes, but to date, little attention has been paid to its role in education for students with special educational needs (SENs). There is no specific model in Hong Kong for supporting career and life planning for SEN students, nor has there been any research on the topic. As a result, their needs are easily overlooked and they have had fewer opportunities to explore and develop their vocational interests. To address this problem, a charitable organization in Hong Kong initiated in 2016 a two-year program for junior secondary students with SEN. The program aimed to develop a service model for supporting career and life planning for these students in Grades 7–9. Evaluation of the program included obtaining views from different stakeholders, including parents of the SEN students. In this chapter, we discuss findings from the evaluation study using a qualitative approach with data from parent interviews. Copyright © 2020 Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.
  • Book Chapters

    6. Assessing career life skills self-efficacy of students with special educational needs: A comparative study in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Book Chapters
    Pages: 313-326
    Year published: 2020
    City published: Singapore
    Publisher: Springer
    The psychological construct of self-efficacy plays a salient role in students’ pursuit of a career path. Career-related self-efficacy is strongly associated with life satisfaction and emotional well-being. Most of what is known about this construct has come from research with mainstream students in the West, and considerably less attention has focused on students with special educational needs. The limited knowledge we have of SEN students’ career-related self-efficacy may be due to lack of appropriate assessment instruments with sound psychometric properties that can be used across cultures. This chapter reports steps taken to validate such an instrument, the Career Development Self-Efficacy Inventory (CD-SEI), for assessing career life skills self-efficacy in SEN students. The authors describe the use of a short form of CD-SEI in Hong Kong with a sample of SEN students and a comparison group without special needs. Theoretical and practical implications of using this instrument to assess career life skills self-efficacy of SEN students are discussed in light of current career development theories. Copyright © 2020 Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.
  • Journal Articles

    7. 國際化視野下香港的大學非本地生教育變革研究
    By: 王軼歐
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: 山西青年職業學院學報, 2019(1), 97-99&103, 2019
    Year published: 2019
    Publisher: 山西青年職業學院
    20世紀90年代以來,香港的大學的教育體系發生了重大變革,國際化是香港的大學教育改革的核心理由之一。國際化視野下的非本地生教育對香港的教育改革和教育發展的啟示主要表現在:第一,教育機會增多,學生來源全球化;第二,順應社會需求,學科課程多樣化;第三,資助渠道互通,籌資途徑多元化。
  • Journal Articles

    8. 內地高校港澳學生的創業就業教育現狀調查 : 基於廣州J大學的調查
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: 港澳研究, 2019(3), 45-49&94, 2019
    Year published: 2019
    Publisher: 國務院港澳事務辦公室
    隨著粵港澳大灣區建設的大力推進,來內地就讀和畢業後留在內地創業就業的港澳學生將不斷增加。本研究通過對港澳學生佔比較大的J大學的調查,發現當前內地高校在港澳學生創業就業教育方面還有進一步改進的空間。政府、高校、產業界等應該聯合推動頂層設計、明確教育目標和思路、兼顧港澳學生的主體性特征、加強師資建設、增設實踐平台、優化考核方案與支持體系,以提升港澳學生創業就業教育實效。
  • Journal Articles

    9. Exploring the contextual influences on adolescent career identity formation: A qualitative study of Hong Kong secondary students
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Journal of Career Development, 46(3), 219-234, 2019
    Year published: 2019
    Publisher: SAGE Publications
    This paper draws on Marcia and Porfeli's identity status models to examine the relationship between adolescent career identity formation and its contextual aspects. Focus group interviews were conducted with 26 students at two Hong Kong senior secondary schools. It was found that most participants exhibited the career identity statuses of achievement, searching moratorium, or moratorium towards the end of school. Influences that were identified from family, school, and social culture varied across individuals with different career identity statuses. By reporting the findings from an East Asian school setting, the paper provides theoretical and practical implications for career development for senior secondary school students.
    [Copyright of Journal of Career Development is the property of SAGE Publications.]
  • Journal Articles

    10. Exploring secondary school students’ self-perception and actual understanding of plagiarism
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Year published: 2019
    Publisher: SAGE Publications
    Plagiarism has been a growing concern among institutions and academics in recent years. To address the problem, and to alleviate the growing trend of this academic misconduct, students' perceptions of plagiarism should be considered. This study explores students' self-perception and actual understanding of plagiarism, and the relations between them. Survey responses were collected from 433 students in a Hong Kong junior secondary school. Results reveal that students show different understanding towards 'obvious' and 'obscure' plagiarism, with misunderstanding or misconception more likely arising over obscure plagiarism. This study also reports that students' self-perception on their understanding of plagiarism differed across grade levels, and their academic performance of inquiry-based learning has a relation to their self-perceived and actual understanding of plagiarism. Implications for improving the teaching and learning of plagiarism are discussed.
    [Copyright of Journal of Librarianship and Information Science is the property of SAGE Publications.]
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