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  • Person: Ho, Esther Sui Chu
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  • Journal Articles

    1. Reading engagement and reading literacy performance: Effective policy and practices at home and in school
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Journal of Research in Reading, 41(4), 657-679, 2018
    Year published: 2018
    Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Based on the data of Program for International Student Assessment 2009, this paper examines how various aspects of home literacy environment, school climate and students' reading engagement related to their reading performance. A profile of Hong Kong students' three indices of reading engagement - namely, reading enjoyment, reading diversity and online reading - relative to other East Asian societies is first presented. The relative contributions of different family-level and classroom-level factors on Hong Kong students' reading engagement are then examined by using hierarchical linear modelling. Assessment of the relative impact of the three engagement indices on reading performance shows that reading enjoyment is the strongest predictor. That home-school cooperation in cultivating a positive reading climate, nurturing a good reading habit for all students and enhancing the classroom and teaching climate appear to be promising avenues for improving students' reading engagement and performance may be of importance for shaping future policy and practice.
    [Copyright of Journal of Research in Reading is the property of John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.]
  • Journal Articles

    2. Structure and agency in adolescents’ expectations of pursuing post-secondary education
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Research in Higher Education, (0), 1-26, 2019
    Year published: 2019
    Publisher: Springer Netherlands
    Past studies have supported the view that parent background and family socioeconomic status determine the post-secondary educational expectations of adolescents. They build on Pierre Bourdieu’s social reproduction theory, but do not fully explain why some adolescents aspire to post-secondary education and some do not. The capability approach adopted by Amartya Sen, uses the concept of agency to address such individual differences and ‘capability to aspire’ may explain educational transitions. The data for this study is drawn from PISA 2012 and its longitudinal extension study of adolescents in Hong Kong. Results of logistic regression analyses suggest that the reproduction effects through school socioeconomic composition and habitus pertaining to parental expectation are major factors shaping adolescents’ expectations of pursuing a bachelor degree. However, agency factors, that is adolescents’ own capabilities, after taking into account their differing family socioeconomic backgrounds, can strengthen their aspirations to pursue a bachelor degree. This combined approach and its implications for theory and practice, as well as the limitations of the study, are discussed.
    [Copyright of Research in Higher Education is the property of Springer Netherlands.]
  • Journal Articles

    3. The use of large-scale assessment (PISA): insights for policy and practice in the case of Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Research Papers in Education, 31(5), 516-528, 2016
    Year published: 2016
    Publisher: Routledge Journals, Taylor & Francis Ltd
    This paper examines to what extent and how the data and results of PISA have been used for various education stakeholders and to what extent PISA affect educational policy and practices in Hong Kong. From the point of view of the government, PISA has played an important role in supporting and legitimising government educational reform since 2000. It has supported curricula frameworks and to some extent development and reform from the philosophical and educational viewpoints. However, the mass media and general public seldom went beyond ranking to look at other variables that might inform policy with the exception of some researchers and curriculum developers. Nonetheless, considerable effort has been expended by key researchers in Hong Kong in disseminating information about PISA prior to and after the administration of each assessment and in sharing the Hong Kong results, through such means as press conferences, seminars, international conferences, research and professional development. Experience from the case of Hong Kong suggested that, by keeping international assessment low stake but making good use of it to inform different stakeholders and initiating teacher professional development could be a cost-effective tool to drive educational reform. However, there is a tendency of overuse or abuse of international assessments by making international assessment high stakes, which might create unnecessary pressure for participating schools, teachers and students.
  • Books

    4. Hong Kong students on line: Digital technologies and reading in PISA 2009
    Document Type: Books
    Year published: 2012
    City published: Hong Kong
    Publisher: Faculty of Education, Hong Kong Institute of Educational Research, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Journal Articles

    5. Family influences on science learning among Hong Kong adolescents: What we learned from PISA
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Year published: 2010
    Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media B.V.
  • Journal Articles

    6. Assessing the quality and equality of Hong Kong basic education results from PISA 2000+ to PISA 2006
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Frontiers of Education in China, 5(2), 238-257, 2010
    Year published: 2010
    Publisher: Gaodeng Jiaoyu Chubanshe
  • Journal Articles

    7. Characteristics of East Asian learners: What we learned from PISA
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Educational Research Journal, 24(2), 327-348, 2009
    Year published: 2009
    City published: Hong Kong
    Publisher: Hong Kong Institute of Educational Research
  • Journal Articles

    8. High stakes testing and its impact on students and schools in Hong Kong: What we have learned from the PISA studies
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: KEDI Journal of Educational Policy, 3(1), 69-87, 2006
    Year published: 2006
    Publisher: Korean Educational Development Institute
  • Journal Articles

    9. Social disparity of family involvement in Hong Kong: Effect of family resources and family network
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: School Community Journal, 16(2), 7-26, 2006
    Year published: 2006
    Publisher: American Association of School Librarians
    Using data from Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) developed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), this study examines the social disparity of family involvement. A total of 4,405 students from 140 Hong Kong secondary schools participated in the first cycle of PISA study identifying four types of family involvement: cultural communication, social communication, homework supervision, and cultural activity. Multi-level analysis was used to examine the major family factors related to these types of family involvement. Consistent with previous research, working-class, immigrant, and single-parent families tend to have lower levels of parental involvement. The effect of these structural factors decreased after family resources, family network, and family norms entered into the multi-level regression model. It can be argued that the social disparity of family involvement is mediated by the deprivation of useful resources, lack of network, and low educational aspiration of the disadvantaged families. The results also suggested that it is not only cooperation between home and school, but also connection between parents and their children's peers that provides the necessary chemistry for success. Educators, parents, and policymakers should be aware that family networking should be extended to include the peers of the teenagers if they want to enhance family involvement in education.
    [Copyright of School Community Journal is the property of American Association of School Librarians.
    Access via Directory of Open Access Journals: http://www.adi.org/journal/]
  • Journal Articles

    10. Students' self-esteem in an Asian educational system: The contribution of parental involvement and parental investment
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: School Community Journal, 13(1), 65-84, 2003
    Year published: 2003
    Publisher: Academic Development Institute
    The contribution of parental involvement and investment to children's education has been a major topic in current educational reform around the world. The purpose of this study is to identify the parental involvement and investment factors which make the greatest contribution to children's self-esteem in Hong Kong. Data for this study was obtained from questionnaires collected from a sample of about 2100 middle grade students (Grades 6-9) and their parents, as well as parents of first grade students, from 18 schools. The study employed factor analysis and Hierarchical Linear Modeling. First, the different dimensions of parental involvement and investment manifest in Hong Kong were clarified. Secondly, the association between parental involvement and investment and family socioeconomic status was estimated. Finally, whether student self-esteem is related to different types of investment and involvement after controlling the background factors was examined.
    [Copyright of School Community Journal is the property of Academic Development Institute.
    Access via Directory of Open Access Journals: http://www.adi.org/journal/]
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