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  • Conference Papers

    1. Ignoring history and facts: The ongoing politicisation of Hong Kong education
    Document Type: Conference Papers
    Conference: The SoE Virtual Doctoral Conference 2020: Mapping and Making Research in Shifting Landscapes - Are You Building Bridges or Getting Lost? (2020: University of Bristol, UK)
  • Journal Articles

    2. New teacher attitudes in educational foundations in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Year published: 2015
    Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
    Although teachers’ attitudes and beliefs are linked to their practice, many argue in social foundations and multicultural education that student-teachers are resistant to changing their attitudes about education’s role in society. Researchers have contended that student-teachers engage in a variety of strategies to maintain attitudes gained through their personal experiences as students, which casts education as key to increasing social mobility and meritocracy in society. This article explores the case of one instructor in teacher education and educational foundations in Hong Kong. Findings from pre- and post-course surveys and online forum writings from students are used to share how student-teachers’ attitudes changed regarding equality and the role of education during the course. The study suggests that the use of a social-constructivist pedagogy that enables student-teachers to learn from their peers’ diverse experiences and professional circumstances can meaningfully impact student-teacher attitudes, and assist new teachers in better understanding education’s role in society. Copyright © 2015 Common Ground, Liz Jackson, All Rights Reserved.
  • Journal Articles

    3. The strategic role of world-class universities in regional innovation system: China's Greater Bay Area and Hong Kong's academic profession
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Year published: 2020
    Publisher: Emerald Publishing Limited
    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the strategic role of world-class universities and the international academic profession in the regionalisation project of China's Greater Bay Area (GBA). It illustrates the way in which the case of the GBA regionalisation project offers a potentially rich empirical example for adding contextual understanding to the literature of the Triple Helix model, which largely draws on inductive theorising from western successful innovation cases. The GBA regionalisation processes will provide a wealth of empirical cases for identifying circumstances that address tensions and increase interactions in the Triple Helix relationship of university, government and industry for fostering knowledge synergies.Design/methodology/approach: Focusing on the case of Hong Kong, it engages in policy and stakeholder analysis and addresses three key research questions: What are the competitive advantages and potential strategic role of Hong Kong's universities and academic profession in the regionalisation of innovation systems in the GBA? What is the role of the governments in the regionalisation processes? What are the expected opportunities and challenges offered by the GBA policy initiatives for the future development of Hong Kong's universities and academic profession?Findings: Hong Kong, given its status as an international finance centre and global city with intense internationalisation and established judicial system operated by the rule of law, will contribute to the GBA development by leveraging on its edge in scientific research and development and international networks of academic research through the world-class academic profession. Scientists and researchers in the city, possessing the competitive advantages of basic research and international partnerships, are highly regarded by the central government. The engagement of Hong Kong's scientific talents, can play an important role in achieving China's aspiration of becoming a global technology power.Research
  • Dissertation Theses

    4. Principal leadership in a Chinese public-private partnership (PPP) school: A case study
    Document Type: Dissertation Theses
    Year published: 2020
    This study was performed to explore how a nationally renowned Chinese principal managed a new reformed school based on a unique public-private partnership (PPP). The investigation was focused on how the principal interacted with key stakeholders and managed the ongoing development of this new school. School M is a unique example of PPP in education, in that it has the status and receives the associated benefits of a public school, but is managed by an entrusted philanthropic educational foundation. The school is co-sponsored and operated as a joint partnership between the local education authority and a prestigious private company. The data collection involved semi-structured interviews with 20 informants (four school leaders, six teachers, two private managers, four governmental officials and four parents), representing the main stakeholders of the school. Data were also collected through participant observation, reflective field notes and archival research at the school. Qualitative and interpretive case analysis was used as the research framework. The data were analyzed using analytical codes and thematic clustering. The results of the study highlighted the complexity of the PPP in School M. During the six-years of the principalship, the partnership brought both leadership opportunities and challenges. These were sorted into five categories: institutional innovation, goal planning, resource allocation, principal appointment and flat management structure. A discussion is provided on the different roles of the stakeholders, namely the government, the private company, vice-principals, middle leaders, teachers, and parents. The results also revealed the broad range of leadership strategies used by the principal to respond to multiple accountabilities. In the conclusions section, recommendations are made for further studies on leadership in a broader socio-cultural context, and the implications are discussed for theory, practice and policy. All rights reserved.
  • Conference Papers

    5. Nuevos liderazgos para desafios permanentes: Influencia para la inclusion educacional
    Document Type: Conference Papers
    Conference: The Summit Educación UC 2020 and IX Jornada de Dirección y Liderazgo Escolar (2020: Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile)
  • Conference Papers

    6. Challenge and opportunity: Principal leadership for whole-school participation in career education in diverse school contexts of Hong Kong
    Document Type: Conference Papers
    Conference: The 33rd Annual University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA): Where y’at: Validating subaltern forms of leadership and learning with/in and outside of schools (2019: Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, USA)
    Policies of career education facilitate the sustainable development of young people in aspirations, identities and pathways of their career development in senior secondary education. In Hong Kong, the policy has been implemented in public schools since 2014. Principals are responsible for leading a whole-school participation in career education for all students. However, student population of individual schools is more diverse than where they were due to a large number of immigrants from different parts of mainland China and other Asian societies. Many principals have experienced the challenges of increasing diversity in schools, if not any opportunity. This paper aims to explore principal leadership for whole-school participation in student career development. Two research questions are asked: What are the challenges of whole-school participation facing the principals in diverse contexts of individual schools? To what extent do students with different cultural, religious and social backgrounds experience the importance of career development in senior secondary education? We adopted a case study of three secondary schools located in different school districts in Hong Kong. The principals were invited to individual semi-structured interview, while 4 to 7 students from each grade of senior secondary education were invited to a focus-group interview in each school. The findings unveil discrepancy of the expected outcomes of the education between the principals’ experiences of the challenges from a leadership perspective and the students’ experiences of any opportunity for their career development from a user perspective. Potential for positive change through the participation in CLP education varies depending on individual students’ awareness, aspiration and exploration of personal career goal. Implications of principal leadership for whole-school participation in career education in relation to equal opportunity for all students are also discussed. Copyright © 2019 UCEA
  • Conference Papers

    7. 香港特殊教育需要的實踐:政策發展與研究重點
    Document Type: Conference Papers
    Conference: 2019年讀寫困難活動日暨第二屆粵港地區讀寫困難服務研討會 (2019: CDI大廈,深圳,中國)
  • Conference Papers

    8. Is principal leadership for social change through career education possible? A case study of three secondary schools in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Conference Papers
    Conference: The British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society Annual Conference 2019 (BELMAS 2019): Educational Leadership for social change (2019: Jury's Inn, Hinckley Island, UK)
  • Conference Papers

    9. Asia knowledge base in educational leadership: A Hong Kong perspective
    Document Type: Conference Papers
    Conference: Asia Leadership Roundtable 2015 (2015: Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand)
  • Journal Articles

    10. Advancing the theory of identity grafting in Chinese school systems
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Year published: 2020
    Publisher: Springer Netherlands
    This paper examines the global implications of policy borrowing, employing case examples of Chinese school systems, which enjoy the success of grafting new identities to improve education. The paper comments on contemporary scholars’ use of identity grafting theory (Lee in Managing Chineseness: identity and ethnic management in Singapore, Palgrave Macmillan, London, 2017) to generate insights on how schools, teachers and students engaged educational change in mainland China, Hong Kong and Singapore. Scholars presented empirical findings by using identity grafting constructs to explain education stakeholders’ diverse responses to change: (1) born-again—rejecting change by reviving traditional practices; (2) repression—repressing traditional identities instead of embracing change; (3) integration—combining traditional identities and progressive change to achieve a balance; and (4) situationalism—developing new identities that transcend boundaries between traditional identities and progressive change. The scholars contributed research that advances the theorization of identity grafting. First, rising born-again Chinese sentiments seek to reject the imposition of a singular Chinese identity imposed by state governments. Born-again Chineseness no longer singularly focuses on defending traditional identities against Western influences. Second, a better understanding is achieved on identity repression—change resistance results from a displaced focus on repressing traditional identities. Third, the prevalence of identity integration strategies can be explained by intensive policy borrowing in the region. Policy borrowers need to ensure externally imposed identities are represented to overcome challenges generated by identity grafting strategies that impede progressive change. This popularity of integrationist strategies accounts for the challenges in achieving identity situationalism—policy borrowing needs culturally divisive identity markers that provide clear indicators to
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