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  • Conference Papers

    11. Application of information technology teaching in a Hong Kong primary school: A road too far?
    Document Type: Conference Papers
    Pages: 1936-1942
    Year published: 2000
    Conference: Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education International Conference 2000 (2000: Chesapeake, VA)
    This paper is a record about the tryout of the application of Information Technology (IT) teaching in a Hong Kong primary school by a lecturer in a local education institute. The paper discussed the preparation for the IT teaching, the problems encountered and the limitations faced during the tryout. The implication of IT teaching is discussed and projected to the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) Government's policy on IT teaching in primary schools. The paper is presented along with a 7-minute documentary video about the experience of IT teaching of the lecturer in a primary school classroom. In-depth interview is conducted on her expectation, problems encountered and her opinions on IT Teaching.
  • Journal Articles

    12. The long march to biliteracy and trilingualism: Language policy in Hong Kong education since the handover
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 33, 302-324, 2013
    Year published: 2013
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Journal Articles

  • Journal Articles

  • Journal Articles

  • Journal Articles

    16. Inclusive education: Teachers' intentions and behaviour analysed from the viewpoint of the theory of planned behaviour
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: International Journal of Inclusive Education, 18(1), 72-85, 2014
    Year published: 2014
    Publisher: Routledge
    The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) claims that behaviour can be predicted by behavioural intention and perceived behavioural control, while behavioural intention is a function of attitude towards the behaviour, subjective norm, and perceived behavioural control. This study aims at providing explanation and prediction of teachers' inclusive education intentions and behaviour under TPB. The main components of TPB were implemented in a survey of 841 teachers from Hong Kong schools in the context of inclusive education. The structural equation modelling results show that TPB fitted the data well (X2/df = 2.84; RMSEA = 0.054; GFI = 0.92; CFI = 0.92; and TLI = 0.91). Identified attributes, including teachers' attitude towards inclusive education, feeling social pressure from important others to carry out inclusive education, and confidence on professional training for involved staff, were found to exert significant predictive power on teachers' intention to implement inclusive education. This intention, together with the confidence on professional training for involved staff, predicts their actual inclusive practice. Teachers' perception of social pressure and adequacy of professional training greatly contribute to predict their intention and behaviour towards inclusive education, respectively. TPB appears to be a sound theoretical framework for understanding teachers' inclusive practice. The results have strong implications for teacher empowerment and professional training in inclusive education.
    [Copyright of International Journal of Inclusive Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13603116.2012.757811]
  • Journal Articles

    17. Globalisation and localisation in music education in Hong Kong and Taiwan
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Comparative Education, 49(2), 163-180, 2013
    Year published: 2013
    City published: Abingdon, Great Britain
    Publisher: Routledge
    The purpose of the study is to analyse and discuss the influences of globalisation and localisation on music education in Hong Kong and Taiwan. It argues that the reform of music education concerns changes to the contents of the curriculum that envisage the cultural and political developments that arise from processes of globalisation and localisation in these two Chinese societies. 'Glocalisation' throughout this essay refers to the interface of the global and the local. I conclude by discussing three issues relating to the processes of glocalisation that have shaped music education and cultural identity in these two changing societies: (1) the multiculturalism of music education; (2) the promotion of local music cultures in the curriculum; and (3) the inclusion of Confucian ethics in song lyrics. This study argues that education that promotes family values and social harmony can satisfy concerns that glocalisation involves the adoption of both Chinese and foreign songs in the school curriculum.
    [Copyright of Comparative Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03050068.2012.686678]
  • Journal Articles

    18. Exploring school improvement in Hong Kong secondary schools
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Peabody Journal of Education, 87(2), 216-234, 2012
    Year published: 2012
    Publisher: Routledge
    Scholars have increasingly sought to understand how the process of school improvement differs among schools operating in different school levels, conditions, and contexts. Using Rosenholtz's (1985) conception of "moving" and "stuck" schools as a framework for thinking about school improvement, this study examines the learning outcomes of 39 Hong Kong secondary schools over a 3-year period. We examine whether features of leadership and school capacity differed with respect to these learning outcomes within the sample of moving and stuck schools. This research in Hong Kong has identified several factors that appear to synergistically contribute to differences in patterns of improvement in learning across different subjects in both moving and stuck schools. These factors include resource management of principals and school capacity in terms of professional learning community; workload of teachers; alignment, coherence, and structure; and resource capacity. This study extends the research on leadership and capacity building as a means of school improvement, in the process elaborating on their impact within a non-Western society.
    [Copyright of Peabody Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0161956X.2012.664474]
  • Journal Articles

    19. Deliberation and school-based curriculum development: A Hong Kong case study
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Year published: 2011
    City published: Hong Kong
    Publisher: Hong Kong Teachers' Association
    Deliberative mode of curriculum development has been hailed as one effective way of developing schoolbased curriculum. Its participatory, egalitarian and discursive characteristics have helped to generate the much-needed synergy and ownership feeling among the curriculum team members that lead to curriculum success. Nevertheless there is little such research in Hong Kong and thus very little is known as to the what, why and how in doing deliberative mode of curriculum development. Aims: This study intended to examine the patterns of curriculum development of a local primary school and how they had evolved over the span of four years. Method: The case school was selected due to its successful curriculum innovations over the years. Two site visits were made to the case school, one in 2003 and one in 2007. Eight teachers and the principal were interviewed and some lesson observations were made. Results: It was found that the success of the school's curriculum development pattern is similar to Decker Walker's 'naturalistic model' which is premised on the notion and practice of deliberation. It is also found that the school's ethos, organizational arrangements and professional relationships contribute to the success of the school's deliberative mode of curriculum development. Conclusion: With the knowledge gained in this study as to the what, why and how of doing a deliberative curriculum development, it is hoped that it will illuminate for local teachers, school administrators and school curriculum development personnel the kind of personal, organizational and social context in order that deliberative curriculum development can thrive and sustain.
    [Copyright of New Horizons: The Journal of Education, Hong Kong Teachers' Association is the property of Hong Kong Teachers' Association at http://www.hkta1934.org.hk/]
  • Journal Articles

    20. Teams in schools: Looking below the surface
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Year published: 1994
    Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Ltd
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