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  • Journal Articles

    1. Early-stage doctoral students' conceptions of research in higher education: Cases from Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Year published: 2020
    Publisher: Routledge
    This qualitative case study investigates two early-stage doctoral students' developing conceptions of research in their situated context. Drawing on data collected from in-depth interviews and informal conversations with the participants over two years, the study showed that the participants' research conceptions were in a symbiotic relationship with their research activities. Also, their developing research conceptions were influenced by their past academic experience and future goals, interaction with significant others in their community, and disciplinary and institutional practices, which acted to change or sustain their perceptions and engagement as an emerging academic. The findings indicate that reflection can be useful for doctoral students to manage their own conceptions of research and for supervisors to adjust practice to enhance doctoral education. Implications for universities regarding how institutional practice and discourse may dominate and foster doctoral students’ research conceptions are provided. Copyright © 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
  • Journal Articles

    2. Understanding university-based teacher educators' boundary crossing experiences: Voices from Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Year published: 2020
    Publisher: Routledge
    This qualitative multi-case study explores a group of university-based language teacher educators' boundary crossing experiences in Hong Kong. Informed by a conceptual framework on boundary crossing and drawing on data from in-depth interviews and field observations, the findings reveal the opportunities and challenges embedded in teacher educators' boundary crossing between university and schools, between the teacher education and academic community, and between local and external contexts. The study contributes new knowledge to our understanding of teacher educators' boundary crossing through two different forms, i.e., horizontal and hierarchical, as they navigate sociocultural differences between various communities. The paper concludes with practical implications on how to promote teacher educators' continuing development in university settings. Copyright © 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
  • Journal Articles

    3. ‘We teach, we record, we edit, and we reflect’: Engaging pre-service language teachers in video-based reflective practice
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Year published: 2020
    Publisher: Sage Publications Ltd.
    The significance of reflective practice (RP) has been widely recognized in both general education and language education. The past years have witnessed an exponential growth of studies in examining how technology can be utilized to promote teachers' RP and video-based RP has been extensively reported as a powerful tool for teacher learning in many educational contexts. While existing literature has documented the potential benefits that student teachers may reap from video-based RP, there is a lack of attention to the complex interplay between the process of their RP and the contextual factors in their situated learning environment. This article reports on a study which aims to promote video-based RP among student teachers in a pre-service language teacher education course in Hong Kong. Drawing on data from post-course interviews with and the videoed reflection of six student teachers, the study uncovered the complex and dynamic process of the student teachers' video-based RP. This article offers practical implications for language teachers, teacher educators and school leaders on how to promote RP in second language teacher education. Copyright © 2020 The Author(s).
  • Conference Papers

    4. The acculturation experiences of non-local university students through their intercultural communication intelligence in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Conference Papers
    Conference: Hong Kong Educational Research Association (HKERA) International Conference 2018: Equity, Access, and Diversity in Education: Theory, Practice, and Research (2018: The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong)
    Informed by research literature about intercultural competence development, this paper aims to explore non-local students’ skills and strategies in communication when they study at a university in Hong Kong. The previous research indicated that they usually experience many problems to adapt into host culture and country because they are lacking in language proficiency and social-cultural knowledge. Students’ prior learning experience, attitude, psychological or behavioural factors can affect their communication skills. In addition, different languages, dialects, accents, characters or cultural difference between their home and host cultures can also cause communication barriers to the students. This study shows that most of the non-local students, mainly the Chinese, still encounter language difficulties in communication in a Chinese society. Such difficulties are reported in studies on Gangpiaos (literally meaning Mainland Chinese drifters in Hong Kong) as well; the word “drifter” implies adaptation difficulties for Mainland Chinese immigrates. Nonetheless, existing empirical studies have been seldom tapped into non-local university students’ intercultural communication capability and how they cope with their communication difficulties in a Chinese society. The present study seeks to fill this research gap in the literature. Based on in-depth interviews with 30 non-local students who were studying in undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programmes, this paper adopted thematic analysis to examine the students’ language obstacles and identify the pattern of their communication practices in the process of intercultural adaptation in Hong Kong. Coping strategies in communication and implications for policies, which assist in young Gangpiaos in developing their intercultural communication knowledge and skills, are drawn based on the findings. Copyright © 2018 HKERA International Conference.
  • Conference Papers

    5. How does friendship influence the adaptation of mainland China higher education students studying in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Conference Papers
    Conference: Hong Kong Educational Research Association (HKERA) International Conference 2018: Equity, Access, and Diversity in Education: Theory, Practice, and Research (2018: The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong)
    This paper explores the influence of friendship in mainland Chinese (MC) students’ adaptation to studying in Hong Kong. The number of MC students in Hong Kong has amounted to 18,887 in 2016, which makes it necessary for universities to cater for these students’ adaptation. Research has identified social-cultural differences between MC students and their local peers despite shared traditional Chinese cultural root. Existing studies have shown that international students can adapt to the new culture better and be more confident by making cross-cultural friends. Previous research has mainly focused on MC students’ difficulties in their adaptation, but how friendship influences their adaptation is still under-researched. This paper addresses the research questions: (1) What strategies do mainland students adopt to establish friendships during their study in Hong Kong? (2) What are the facilitating and hindering factors for mainland students to establish friendship? (3) How can friendship help mainland students adapt to their study and life in Hong Kong? A total of 24 MC university students studying in Hong Kong were interviewed. Thematic analysis was employed for data analysis. The findings show that friendship plays an important role in MC students’ adaptation to studying in Hong Kong, especially regarding daily life routines, such as how to deal with visa issues and navigate the university’s course selection system. MC students build friendships mainly through taking part in social and academic learning activities. Nonetheless, political-social conflicts between Hong Kong and Mainland China have, to a certain extent, hindered friendship establishment between MC and local students. Copyright © 2018 HKERA International Conference.
  • Book Chapters

    6. Community of practice: Building a mobile learning community in a higher education institution to promote effective teaching and learning
    Document Type: Book Chapters
    Pages: 19-38
    Year published: 2017
    City published: Singapore
    Publisher: Springer
    With the fast development of mobile technologies, mobile learning has been adopted by more and more students and staff in higher education institutions. However, most students and staff tend to explore mobile learning as individuals, and there is a lack of systematic exchange of ideas and strategies related to mobile learning among them. This chapter reports on a project on building a mobile learning community (MLC) to promote mobile learning in a Hong Kong tertiary institution. The research questions are as follows: ‘What are the key factors in building a successful mobile learning community?’ and ‘How can the effectiveness of the MLC be evaluated?’ The key factors identified in building a successful mobile learning community are recruitment of community members, establishment of a mobile learning community website as a platform for exchange of ideas, organization of sharing seminars/workshops, making an impact on students’ learning and on staff development. The evaluation of the effectiveness of the mobile learning community will also be deliberated. It is hoped that this chapter can provide some practical guidance and useful references for those who wish to establish a mobile learning community in their institutions in order to promote Scholarship of Learning & Teaching (SoLT).
  • Book Chapters

    7. Development of an effective staff professional development for the enhancement of student learning
    Document Type: Book Chapters
    Pages: 75-90
    Year published: 2017
    City published: Singapore
    Publisher: Springer
    Higher education institutions around the world have increasingly been concerned with staff professional development (SPD) programmes for academic and teaching (A/T) staff. Since its establishment in 1994, an education university in Hong Kong (which we will refer to as the University) has offered primarily teacher education to foster the development of quality teachers. To meet the demand for students’ holistic and whole-person development for the twenty-first century, the University has sought to broaden the range of programmes offered, introducing the concept of ‘Education-Plus’. Under the ‘Education-Plus’ vision, the University has been expanding non-education programmes rapidly since 2010. Many new A/T staff with limited teaching experience have been recruited, needing professional development (PD) to enhance their skills and knowledge. Since 2013, the Centre for Learning, Teaching and Technology (LTTC) has designed and developed an SPD programme to allow A/T staff to enrich their PD and ultimately enhance student learning. The evaluation of the current SPD programme activities revealed that the PD activities were beneficial to A/T’s teaching and their PD, but the question has arisen as to whether the current SPD programme is effective, e.g. whether A/T staff have obtained and applied new knowledge and skills to teaching. This paper will discuss the design of the current SPD programme and analyze its activities. The design outlined in ‘Three Stages of Professional Development: The Cycle of Change’ (Bellanca, 2009) will be referred to in order to develop an effective SPD programme. The paper will also design and propose a framework to evaluate the effectiveness of the SPD programme and its implementation cycle.
  • Journal Articles

    8. The role of e-portfolios in supporting productive learning
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: British Journal of Educational Technology, 47(6), 1276-1286, 2016
    Year published: 2016
    Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
    e-Portfolios are a form of authentic assessment with formative functions that include showcasing and sharing learning artifacts, documenting reflective learning processes, connecting learning across various stages and enabling frequent feedback for improvements. This paper examines how e-portfolios take up these formative roles to support productive learning. Qualitative findings from interviews with selected first-year undergraduate students at a higher education institution in Hong Kong are reported concerning students' experiences of constructing e-portfolios as assessment tasks. As part of an institutional teaching and learning initiative, e-portfolios were incorporated into three core courses for first-year students. The findings reveal that several conditions necessary to foster productive learning were missing in students' experiences: strengthened formative role of e-portfolios through coherent assessment design; encouragement for students' pursuit of authentic tasks to develop learning interests; engagement of students in reflective and self-regulative learning as an essential learning process; provision of constructive feedback for sustained learning support; and support for students' autonomy through facilitation of collaborative knowledge building. By explicating how the lack of these conditions impeded students' active involvement in e-portfolio tasks and suggesting relevant strategies for teachers at the institution in question, this paper offers implications for harnessing information and communication technology (ICT) to support students' productive learning.
  • Journal Articles

    9. Social involvement and development as a response to the campus student culture
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Education Review, 12(3), 393-402, 2011
    Year published: 2011
    Publisher: Springer
  • Journal Articles

    10. Transition, induction and goal achievement: First-year experiences of Hong Kong undergraduates
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Education Review, 13(2), 359-368, 2012
    Year published: 2012
    Publisher: Springer
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