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  • Person: Chee, Wai Chi
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  • Journal Articles

    1. Home-based parental involvement amongst Pakistani families in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, (0), - , 2019
    Year published: 2019
    Publisher: Routledge
    Ethnic minority parents often appear to be less involved in school functions and activities than their culturally dominant counterparts. Their invisibility is usually assumed due to a lack of either interest or parental capacity to oversee their children's education. However, the simplistic equation between parental involvement in children's education and their participation in school is largely informed by middle-class cultural norms that ignore diversity. Data drawn from home visits and in-depth, semi-structured interviews amongst Pakistani parents and children in Hong Kong reveals that the involvement of these parents only seems less visible because it is largely based at home rather than in schools. The parental involvement of this ethnic minority is influenced by socio-economic and cultural factors that separate school from home, divide parental responsibilities by gender, and set expectations for children with primary reference to the parents' own experiences. These research findings on how such characteristics shape the outcomes of parental involvement can inform school practices to build more effective home-school collaboration and enhance children's academic achievement.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge.]
  • Journal Articles

    2. Local and global, but not national: Citizenship education of South Asian migrant students in post-colonial Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Anthropology & Education Quarterly, (0), - , 2019
    Year published: 2019
    Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
    This article examines how schools in Hong Kong attempt to craft South Asian migrant students into desirable citizens and how the youths understand themselves as members of Hong Kong and of a global community. The contestation has to do both with how South Asians are viewed in Hong Kong and with how post-colonial Hong Kong is related to China. The process of citizen-making of transnational youths, I argue, is best understood at the local-national-global intersection.
    [Copyright of Anthropology & Education Quarterly is the property of Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.]
  • Journal Articles

    3. Opportunities, challenges, and transitions: Educational aspirations of Pakistani migrant youth in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Children's Geographies, 16(1), 92-104, 2018
    Year published: 2018
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis Ltd.
    Through the experiences of Pakistani-migrant families in Hong Kong, this paper explores ethnic minority students' aspirations for education, work and the future in a context where education is highly valued but also extremely competitive. The first part depicts how Pakistani youth and their parents articulate their aspirations and opportunities and investigates the sociopolitical changes in education that are creating new opportunities for young Pakistani students. The second part considers the challenges from the larger Hong Kong society and within the Pakistani community that may hamper aspirations. The last part examines transitions and promises and the ways Pakistani youth negotiate for better futures. This article delineates the intertwining dynamics of cultural consensus, cultural dissonance and children's agency as the youth navigate the terrain of education and career.
    [Copyright of Children's Geographies is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd.]
  • Journal Articles

    4. The perceived role of religion in the educational attainment of Pakistani immigrant secondary students in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asian Anthropology, 14(1), 33-42, 2015
    Year published: 2015
    Publisher: Routledge
    The academic underachievement of ethnic minorities, especially Pakistanis, in Hong Kong is well-recognized. This is stereotypically attributed to Islamic practices that are perceived to impede education, yet the voices of Pakistani parents and children are seldom heard. This research seeks to illuminate how Pakistani Muslim immigrant students and their parents understand the role of religion in education. The key finding highlights how both parents and students rate religion and education as highly important, and maintain that the two complement—rather than contradict—each other. They reject the public perception that Islam discourages the education of females, asserting that Islam upholds equality, including gender equality. Nonetheless, and maybe paradoxically, females interviewed during this research do encounter greater challenges than males in pursuing an education. In the young women's understanding, this comes from gendered cultural practices that are not necessarily endorsed by Islam. In response, both parents and daughters fight against, or conform to, these practices.
    [Copyright of Asian Anthropology is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1683478X.2015.1025592]
  • Journal Articles

    5. Envisioned belonging: Cultural differences and ethnicities in Hong Kong schooling
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asian Anthropology, 11, 89-105, 2012
    Year published: 2012
    Publisher: Routledge
  • Journal Articles

    6. Negotiating teacher professionalism: Governmentality and education reform in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Ethnography and Education, 7(3), 327-344, 2012
    Year published: 2012
    Publisher: Routledge
    This research investigates how the Hong Kong state controls and disciplines the education sector through the regulation and manipulation of discourses. The authoritative narratives are that some schools are failing the students and parents for not being able to provide quality education, and that these schools are not subject to public scrutiny while spending public money. This article seeks to understand the role of such narratives in neoliberal politics and the marketisation of education which lead to governance in the form of initiatives in school quality assurance mechanism; how different actors (Education Bureau, Professional Teachers' Union and individual teachers) are involved in the process; how they negotiate this governance of education; how such governance transforms the self-perception of teachers as well as the perception of teachers by others; and how teachers interpret, appropriate and resist such discursive power.
    [Copyright of Ethnography and Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17457823.2012.717201]
  • Journal Articles

    7. When the cultural model of success fails: Mainland Chinese teenage immigrants in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Taiwan Journal of Anthropology, 8(2), 85-110, 2010
    Year published: 2010
    Publisher: Academia Sinica, Institute of Ethnology
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