Search for books, chapters, journal articles and reports online.

Applied Filters Clear
  • [B] Human Behaviour
Search Results: 41 - 50 of 677
Sort by:
  • Journal Articles

    41. Perceived child behaviour problems, parenting stress, and marital satisfaction: Comparison of new arrival and local parents of preschool children in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Hong Kong Medical Journal, 13(5), 364-371, 2007
    Year published: 2007
    Publisher: Hong Kong Academy of Medicine;Hong Kong Medical Association
    OBJECTIVE: To compare parental perception of child behaviour problems, parenting stress, and marital satisfaction in new arrival and local parents. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey; semi-structured interview. SETTING: Maternal and Child Health Centres, social service centres, preschools. PARTICIPANTS: Parents of preschool children, including new arrival parents and local parents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Child behaviour problems, parenting stress, and marital satisfaction. RESULTS: After controlling for socio-economic factors, new arrival parents were more troubled by their children's behaviour problems and their parent-child interactions were more dysfunctional than those of local parents. There were no differences in parent-reported severity of child behaviour problems, parental distress, and marital satisfaction. New arrival parents reported difficulties in adapting to the new living environment and lack of social support. CONCLUSIONS: New arrival parents were more troubled by their children's behaviour, and their parent-child interactions were more dysfunctional than those of local parents. These might in part be related to their settlement difficulties. Parenting programmes should address their specific settlement needs.
    [Copyright of Hong Kong Medical Journal is the property of Hong Kong Academy of Medicine & Hong Kong Medical Association.]
  • Book Chapters

    42. Teacher stress in working with behavioral problems of students in Hong Kong: A comparative study
    Document Type: Book Chapters
    Pages: 309-333
    Year published: 2012
    City published: Charlotte, N.C.
    Publisher: Information Age Pub
  • Journal Articles

    43. Emotional intelligence and self-efficacy among physical education teachers
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, 32(4), 342-354, 2013
    Year published: 2013
    Publisher: Human Kinetics
  • Journal Articles

    44. Exploring Asian students' citizenship values and their relationship to civic knowledge and school participation
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Educational Psychology, 33(3), 233-254, 2013
    Year published: 2013
    Publisher: Routledge
    Empirical evidence of Asian students' traditional citizenship values was provided in the Asian Regional Module (ARM) of the International Civic and Citizenship Study. This paper is based on a secondary analysis of the ARM data. Three issues are addressed. First, a theoretical analysis of the ARM constructs contributes to their construct validity. Second, the endorsement of these constructs by students from five Asian societies is compared indicating that some of the differences between societies were statistically significant, although effect sizes were generally weak or moderate. Third, the predictive validity of the constructs was examined. They had a small but differential effect on students' civic knowledge and a generally negligible effect on school participation. Variance at school and individual level accounted for by the ARM constructs differed across societies. The implications of these results for civic education and future research in the field are discussed.
    [Copyright of Educational Psychology is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01443410.2013.775003]
  • Journal Articles

    45. Asian civic values: A cross-cultural comparison of three East Asian societies
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia-Pacific Education Researcher, 22(1), 21-31, 2013
    Year published: 2013
    Publisher: De La Salle University Manila
  • Journal Articles

    46. Effects of depressive symptoms and family satisfaction on health related quality of life: The Hong Kong FAMILY study
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: PL o S One, 8(3), e58436-e58436, 2013
    Year published: 2013
    Publisher: Public Library of Science
    Objective: To examine the effect of depressive symptoms and satisfaction with family support (FS) on physical and mental Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). Methods: Data were obtained from the Hong Kong FAMILY Project baseline survey in 2009-2011, which included 16,039 community residents (age >= 20). The FS was measured using the Family Adaptation, Partnership, Growth, Affection, Resolve (APGAR, range 0-10) Questionnaire. HRQoL were assessed using the SF-12 version 2. Depressive symptoms were recorded using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Demographic and lifestyle variables, stressful life events, perceived neighborhood cohesion were also assessed. Results: In a multilevel regression model, socio-demographic and behavioral variables explained 21% and 19% of the variance in physical and mental HRQoL. The presence of depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 score >= 10, standardized coefficients, beta of -1.73) and high FS (APGAR score 7-10, 1.15) were associated with mental HRQoL, after adjustment for age, education, household monthly income, drinking status, physical activity, chronic conditions, life stress and neighborhood cohesion. Not FS but the presence of depressive symptoms (beta of -0.88) was associated with physical HRQoL. The presence of depressive symptoms in women than men were more associated with a poorer physical HRQoL (p<0.01) while depressive symptoms in men were associated with a decrease in mental HRQoL (p<0.001). The interaction between FS and depressive symptoms was nonsignificant in relation to HRQoL. Among those with depressive symptoms, high FS was associated with a better mental HRQoL (41.1 vs. 37.9, p<0.001) in women but not contribute to variance in men. Conclusions: Higher FS and presence of depressive symptoms were significantly associated with HRQoL in general population in Hong Kong. Among those with depressive symptoms, high FS was associated with a favorable mental HRQoL in women but not men.
    [Copyright of PL o S One is the property
  • Journal Articles

  • Journal Articles

    48. Differences between the personal, social and emotional profiles of teaching and computer engineering professionals and students
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Studies in Higher Education, 39(7), 1185-1201, 2014
    Year published: 2014
    Publisher: Routledge
    The evidence suggests that emotional intelligence and personality traits are important qualities that workers need in order to successfully exercise a profession. This article assumes that the main purpose of universities is to promote employment by providing an education that facilitates the acquisition of abilities, skills, competencies and values. In this study, the emotional intelligence and personality profiles of two groups of Spanish students studying degrees in two different academic disciplines - computer engineering and teacher training were analysed and compared. In addition, the skills forming part of the emotional intelligence and personality traits required by professionals (computer engineers and teachers) in their work were studied, and the profiles obtained for the students were compared with those identified by the professionals in each field. Results revealed significant differences between the profiles of the two groups of students, with the teacher training students scoring higher on interpersonal skills; differences were also found between professionals and students for most competencies, with professionals in both fields demanding more competencies that those evidenced by graduates. The implications of these results for the incorporation of generic social, emotional and personal competencies into the university curriculum are discussed.
    [Copyright of Studies in Higher Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2013.777410]
  • Journal Articles

    49. Constructing the cultural 'other': Prejudice and intergroup conflict in university students' discourses about 'the other'
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Language and Intercultural Communication, 14(2), 156-175, 2014
    Year published: 2014
    Publisher: Routledge
    This article analyses how university students in Hong Kong talk about 'self' and 'other'. Three groups of students, Hong Kong Chinese, Mainland Chinese, and Overseas Exchange students, were asked to characterise these three groups in a pre-discussion questionnaire, and subsequently discuss freely what they had written. Selected excerpts from these discussions are analysed, and the analyses show that there are significant differences between the written and the oral responses. The pre-discussion stereotypes appear to be predominantly positive, whereas the students jointly construct predominantly negative stereotypes about 'the other' during their discussions. Different discourse strategies are employed by the three groups to discredit 'the other' and, at the same time, enhance intergroup differentiation and a positive ingroup identity. The findings are discussed vis-a-vis predominantly social psychological theories, and the study highlights that the attempt to create more internationalised universities may be jeopardised if negative intergroup stereotypes prevail. The article suggests that universities should take a more proactive role in promoting anti-racist multicultural education to counter intergroup prejudice and potential conflict.
    [Copyright of Language and Intercultural Communication is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14708477.2013.849718]
  • Journal Articles

    50. Youth in a global world: Attitudes towards globalization and global citizenship among university students in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 34(1), 107-124, 2014
    Year published: 2014
    Publisher: Routledge
    Despite the wealth of theoretical literature on globalization and global citizenship, empirical studies on the topic are lacking, especially in the context of pedagogical needs in relation to global citizenship education. In order to address this gap, a study was conducted in Hong Kong to investigate the attitudes of university students towards various dimensions of globalization and global citizenship. The initial results indicate that Hong Kong university students are generally quite aware of globalization's impact on the economy and personal consumption choices and that while there is considerable apathy towards international affairs, there is also a great interest in cross-cultural service learning opportunities that is not being met by the available programmes. Moreover, this study finds almost no association between age, gender, and religion and any of the measured dependent variables on attitudes towards globalization and global citizenship, the only exception being the factor of past intercultural experiences, where a significant difference in measured attitudes was found between respondents who had and respondents who had not participated in such experiences before. Explanations of the findings and the implications of findings for policy and future research are discussed.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02188791.2013.810143]
Updating