Search for books, chapters, journal articles and reports online.

Applied Filters Clear
  • [B] Human Behaviour
Search Results: 31 - 40 of 677
Sort by:
  • Books

    31. Components of successful emotional education: Promoting positive behaviour, emotional competence and educational engagement in schools
    Document Type: Books
    Year published: 2012
    City published: Hong Kong
    Publisher: Hong Kong Institute of Education
    This lecture explores evidence based approaches to meeting the needs of students presenting with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties (SEBD) in mainstream schools. It is argued that the SEBD phenomenon, although omnipresent, comes to particular public prominence in education in times of change. It is not surprising, therefore, that in a world dominated by social, economic and sustainability concerns, and in the concomitant educational climate characterized by sometimes competing emphases on performativity and social inclusion, that SEBD is a topic of particular interest in Hong Kong and across the developed world. After considering issues of definition and aetiology the focus of the lecture shifts to intervention. Particular attention is given to evidence on the qualities and skills of effective teachers and teaching in relation to SEBD, and the need for educators’ understandings of SEBD to be located within a biopsychosocial paradigm. The fundamental significance of physiological issues is discussed and the value of various empirically validated psychologically based interventions (e.g. psychodynamic, humanistic, behavioural, cognitive-behavioural and ecosystemic) is explored. Consideration is given to the sometimes neglected needs of teachers and parents in relation to SEBD. Challenges and questions elating to the cultural assumptions underpinning some of the dominant thinking in this area are discussed are also explored. Finally, policy and practice implications are addressed.
    [Copyright © 2012 The Hong Kong Institute of Education]
  • Conference Papers

    32. Do parents and kindergarten teachers in Hong Kong value the same qualities in young children? Implications for early childhood education in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Conference Papers
    Year published: 1997
    Conference: National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) 1997 Annual Conference (1997: California)
  • Journal Articles

    33. Some possible effects of behaviour management training on teacher confidence and competence: Evidence from a study of primary school teachers in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Educational Studies, 41(1), 156-170, 2014
    Year published: 2014
    Publisher: Routledge
    This study aims to explore the relationships between the extent and perceived quality of teachers' experience of training in behaviour management (BM), and their awareness of the nature and extent of behavioural problems among school students, and their confidence in their own competence to deal with such problems. Teachers (n=183) from Hong Kong primary schools were surveyed. The results showed that gender, age and whether teachers have received training had no significant influence on teachers' awareness, conception and confidence regarding BM. A negative correlation was found between teachers' levels of satisfaction in relation to their training experiences and their perceptions of the level of problematic behaviours among students, and the impact of students' problematic behaviour on their teaching. A positive correlation was found between teachers' levels of satisfaction in relation to their training experiences and their confidence in their own competence to deal with students' problematic behaviour.
  • Journal Articles

    34. A latent class growth analysis of school bullying and its social context: The self-determination theory perspective
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: School Psychology Quarterly, 30(1), 75-90, 2015
    Year published: 2015
    Publisher: American Psychological Association
    The contribution of social context to school bullying was examined from the self-determination theory perspective in this longitudinal study of 536 adolescents from 3 secondary schools in Hong Kong. Latent class growth analysis of the student-reported data at 5 time points from grade 7 to grade 9 identified 4 groups of students: bullies (9.8%), victims (3.0%), bully-victims (9.4%), and typical students (77.8%). There was a significant association between academic tracking and group membership. Students from the school with the lowest academic performance had a greater chance of being victims and bully-victims. Longitudinal data showed that all 4 groups tended to report less victimization over the years. The victims and the typical students also had a tendency to report less bullying over the years, but this tendency was reversed for bullies and bully-victims. Perceived support from teachers for relatedness significantly predicted membership of the groups of bullies and victims. Students with higher perceived support for relatedness from their teachers had a significantly lower likelihood of being bullies or victims. The findings have implications for the theory and practice of preventive interventions in school bullying.
    [Copyright © 2014 American Psychological Association.]
  • Books

    35. 華人社會青少年院護及特殊敎育服務
    Document Type: Books
    Year published: 2004
    City published: 香港
    Publisher: 商務印書館
  • Books

    36. 越軌列車十七班 : 八十年代前後的香港教育個案
    By: 楊江
    Document Type: Books
    Year published: 1986
    City published: 香港
    Publisher: 百姓半月刊
  • Dissertation Theses

  • Conference Papers

    38. Teachers perception on behavioural problems
    Document Type: Conference Papers
    Year published: 1996
    Conference: Hong Kong Educational Research Association (HKERA) 13th Annual Conference: Restructuring Schools in Changing Societies (1996: The Hong Kong Institute of Education)
    Perception involves the discovery, detection, impression, interpretation and comprehension of a particular event and is a kind of human mental activities. Lots of research investigate this psychological phenomenon by exploring the teachers' thinking processes and ways of construing their perception (Eibaz, 1981; Morine- Dershimer, 1009; Schon, 1983. As reflective practitioners, teachers develop schemata on how to teach or make decision effectively in their classroom teaching. They form judgments about their students' academic performance and classroom behaviors, and evaluate them to see if they are acceptable or unacceptable, typical or atypical, normal or deviant. These judgments become the basis of their decisions which lead to the subsequent responses or behavioral patterns. The ability of perceiving the nature and severity of classroom problems and making judgments is unique and crucial in the process of early identification. The schemata they use help them to identify the learning, emotional or conduct cause of a particular behavioral problem. However, teachers from different backgrounds (primary, secondary, special education, remedial teaching, pre-service or inservice teachers) will have a perceptual difference on behavioral problems. A survey investigating the teachers' perception of children with behavioral problems was conducted on 568 school teachers in Hong Kong. Teachers of different backgrounds were presented with the descriptions of some typical behavioral problems and they had to judge the learning, emotion or conduct cause of the cases. This study attempted to explore how well the teachers with distinct school backgrounds perceived the presented cases. The result revealed that most teachers perceived more learning problems but fewer conduct problems in the cases. The teachers found to be sensible to the learning and emotion causes of their children . Different groups of teachers held divergent views on perceiving the cases. More secondary and student
  • Conference Papers

    39. Hong Kong teachers' perceptions of student problems: A preliminary report on sources and outcomes of newly arrived students
    Document Type: Conference Papers
    Year published: 2004
    Conference: 5th iAPED International Conference on Education Research (The 5th ICER) (2004: Seoul, South Korea)
  • Journal Articles

    40. Depressive symptomatology in students with emotional and behavioural problems in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Hong Kong Special Education Forum, 1(2), 54-67, 1998
    Year published: 1998
    Publisher: Centre for Special Educational Needs and Inclusive Education, The Hong Kong Institute of Education;Special Education Society of Hong Kong
    The Chinese version of the Beck Depression Inventory (C-BDI) was administered to all the 155 adolescents currently attending special schools for maladjusted boys in Hong Kong and 132 of them completed the questionnaire. Utilizing cut-off points developed by Beck, 44 adolescents (33.3%) were nondepressed, 26 (19.7%) were mildly depressed, 26 (19.7%) were moderately depressed and 36 (27.3%) were severly depressed. Total BDI scores of subjects were not signficantly related to age, length of stay in special schools or acting out behaviors. However, subjects observed to have acting out behaviors by their class teachers were found to be suffering from substantial depressive symptomatology and not as what their surface behaviors indicate.
    [Copyright of Hong Kong Special Education Forum is the property of Centre for Special Educational Needs and Inclusive Education, The Hong Kong Institute of Education & Special Education Society of Hong Kong.]
Updating