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  • Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education
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  • Journal Articles

    41. Managing human capital in world cities: The development of Hong Kong into an education hub
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 31(3), 249-262, 2011
    Year published: 2011
    Publisher: Routledge
    Since 2004, the Hong Kong government has sought to build a regional education hub and develop an education industry. However, the rationales and intentions behind this move and the implications these have for the nurturing of local human capital and economic capacity are not always clear. This article seeks to contextualize Hong Kong's economic development within the global economy. Various related official policy documents are examined to decipher the role of the Hong Kong government and to ascertain how the development of a regional education hub and an education industry features in its plans. It is analysed that up till 2009, the goal of attracting foreign and Mainland human resources and talent, as a way to facilitate the inflow of human capital into Hong Kong, has overridden the goal of a viable and self-sustaining education industry. The article questions whether such a policy orientation is in the best interests of Hong Kong and whether developing Hong Kong into an education hub should be mainly seen as being a way of upgrading and revitalizing local higher education in order to better serve the local economy, which is under pressure to transform into a knowledge-based economy and to develop new growth poles.
    [Copyright of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02188791.2011.594418]
  • Journal Articles

    42. Identity and sense of belonging in post-colonial education in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 30(4), 433-448, 2010
    Year published: 2010
    Publisher: Routledge
    This paper explores the construction of local and national identities among secondary school students in post-colonial Hong Kong. As a Chinese society that has undergone a prolonged period of British colonial rule, the reunification of capitalist Hong Kong with the motherland under socialism in 1997 has set the context for a negotiation of identities. It has been revealed that the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region has tried to foster a stronger sense of national identity and a sense of belonging among the younger generations through its education reform measures in the new millennium. Nation-building is part and parcel of the reform, although it is being interpreted and implemented diversely by local officials, school principals and teachers. The intersecting and overlapping nature of students' different identities has set the parameters of their identity formation but allows different latitudes of observance and/or choice of different identities.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02188791.2010.519691]
  • Journal Articles

    43. Human resource development in east Asia: A comparative analysis
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 17(1), 7-26, 1997
    Year published: 1997
    Publisher: Routledge
  • Journal Articles

    44. Return of the ghost--To discipline or/and to teach?
    By: Shu, Jack
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 30(1), 105-120, 2010
    Year published: 2010
    Publisher: Routledge
    This paper is a situated biographical reflection on the author's Hong Kong teaching experience written using a narrative inquiry approach, describing attempts to generate innovative pedagogical practices. The journey explores how autocratic, traditional Chinese cultural expectations in Hong Kong education have nurtured a commonsense belief in "discipline first and then teach". This teacher/researcher adopted alternative approaches to authority through the use of developmental drama which made teacher image and teacher-student power relationships an object of talk and study. The aim of this paper is to bring together theories and pedagogical models based on the sociology of education, social psychology and drama pedagogy in an effort to change how we teach marginalized students in one distinctive Chinese cultural context.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02188790903503627]
  • Journal Articles

    45. Markers' perceptions regarding the onscreen marking of liberal studies in the Hong Kong public examination system
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 30(3), 249-271, 2010
    Year published: 2010
    Publisher: Routledge
    This article reports the move from paper-based marking (PBM) to onscreen marking (OSM) in Hong Kong for the subject Liberal Studies - whose objectives involve broadening students' horizons through critical examination of current issues. While currently a small candidature subject of approximately 3300, from 2009, the subject will become compulsory for all students in Hong Kong's senior secondary school curriculum with a candidature of 80,000. As marking of all public examinations in Hong Kong is migrating to OSM, the current study reports on a project with the entire 2009 Year 13 Liberal Studies marking panel (49 markers), as part of the OSM validation process. The study involved giving all markers both a pre-marking and a post-marking questionnaire to gauge markers' technological competence in and attitudes towards OSM. Results were positive in that markers generally rated themselves as technologically capable. With regard to attitudes towards the implementation of OSM, the outcomes of the post-marking questionnaire showed markers to be more positive than their pre-marking comments suggested. Nonetheless, they are still not happy about having to travel to special marking centres and the preference for PBM remains strong. The results of the study indicate that OSM is being accepted into marker psyche of what marking involves, an important step as OSM is adopted as the sole marking method for all subjects in Hong Kong from 2012 onwards.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02188791.2010.495836]
  • Journal Articles

    46. Teacher identity construction across the curriculum: promoting cross-curriculum collaboration in English-medium schools
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 30(2), 167-183, 2010
    Year published: 2010
    Publisher: Routledge
    This article reports on a qualitative study that explored the prospects for the promotion of collaborative relationships between English as a Second Language (ESL) and content teachers in Hong Kong. At the time of the study, the eight participants, four content teachers and four ESL teachers, were all teaching in English-medium secondary schools in Hong Kong. The study drew upon interview data to examine how the participants' construction of teacher identities can shape possibilities for collaboration between ESL and content teachers. The paper begins by discussing some of the key issues in promoting collaboration between content and ESL teachers, then draws upon the works of Wenger and Fairclough to describe a framework for understanding the construction of teacher identity in practice and in discourse. The framework is applied to reveal the major challenges facing the promotion of collaboration between content and ESL teachers. Implications for institutional change that might promote these collaborative relations are also discussed.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02188791003721622]
  • Journal Articles

    47. Women teachers in Hong Kong: Stories of changing gendered identities
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 30(2), 213-229, 2010
    Year published: 2010
    Publisher: Routledge
    In a time of mass schooling in most parts of the world, the discourse of the owoman primary teachero is often the subject of discourse. Yet most stories of these women teachers emerge from other (Western) contexts, with little known about how changing education processes affect the gendered identities of women in other cultural settings. This paper explores how women teachers negotiate their gendered identities in Hong Kong, where modernization has already mingled with the indigenous Chinese culture. It provides the stories of four Chinese women teachers as they engage in ongoing construction and negotiations of gendered identities over their life histories in Hong Kong. All are ethnically Chinese, of different ages and at different stages of their personal and professional lives, and all have grown up in Hong Kong. A framework of post-colonial concepts of hybridity and border crossing helps to suggest how identity resources develop in relation to a range of contemporary practices which are experienced as both pressures and opportunities. These Chinese women teachers' identities are seen to be complex, fluid and multi-faceted, continually under construction in their daily lives, with changes experienced in both work and family settings.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02188791003721978]
  • Journal Articles

    48. Comparing overexcitabilities of gifted and non-gifted school children in Hong Kong: Does culture make a difference?
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 30(1), 71-83, 2010
    Year published: 2010
    Publisher: Routledge
    Overexcitabilities (OEs) are ways that an individual experiences the world and can be understood as channels of information flow. The current study examined the profile of OEs among a group of Hong Kong children. Participants included 229 non-gifted and 217 gifted children. OEs were measured using the Overexcitability Questionnaire II. Results indicated that there were differences between the gifted and the non-gifted groups in all OE subscales. Gender differences were also identified. Females, in both gifted and non-gifted groups, have a significantly higher score in Emotional OE when compared to males. In addition, gifted females also scored significantly higher than their male counterparts in Sensual OE. Results of this study were compared to a group of American children (based on C.L. Tieso's work on overexcitabilities in 2007). The implications and limitations of this study are presented.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02188790903503601]
  • Journal Articles

    49. Lessons learned? School leadership and curriculum reform in Hong Kong
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 30(2), 231-242, 2010
    Year published: 2010
    Publisher: Routledge
    This paper examines the processes of implementing curriculum reform in schools. Specifically, it investigates how schools learn lessons from previous experiences of reform and apply them when challenged by new reforms. The context for this study is Hong Kong's New Secondary School Curriculum (NSSC), with particular reference to the subject of English Language. Research into the enactment of change over the last decade tells a story of weak leadership and management by policy makers, schools leaders and teachers. Key areas of weakness - poor management of change by school leaders, teachers' lack of understanding of the changes, and weak teacher collaboration - were pinpointed as reasons for the dismal results of curriculum change. This study investigates whether these areas of weakness were also in the implementation of the NSSC. Data collection comprised semi-structured interviews in nine secondary schools. The study reveals that lessons had been learnt from the previous experiences of implementing reform, and suggests that the capacity of schools to learn from a historical perspective should be taken into account in curriculum planning.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02188791003722000]
  • Journal Articles

    50. Beginning teachers' perceptions of school human resource practices
    Document Type: Journal Articles
    Source: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 29(3), 373-386, 2009
    Year published: 2009
    Publisher: Routledge
    Human resource (HR) management is defined as the sum of activities employed by an organization to attract, develop, and retain people with the appropriate knowledge and skills for effectively and efficiently achieving organizational goals. An understanding of the HR practices in schools is important, as the assembly of a team of qualified and committed teachers, directly or indirectly, affects the quality of instruction in general and in particular in Hong Kong, where a high wastage rate of new teachers has been recorded. The literature has emphasized the importance of each HR element in school and yet not much work has been done that attempts to link the various HR elements together, even though the complementarities and interdependencies among these practices have been acknowledged. The present study aims to provide a general picture of the HR practices in schools from the perspective of beginning teachers, using a quantitative methodology. In addition, the link between these practices and the beginning teachers' commitment was also examined. The findings confirm the complexity and diversity of HR practices in Hong Kong schools and suggest that the practices in the areas of Training and Development and Working Conditions warrant special attention as they are linked to the affective commitment of new teachers to schools.
    [Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Education is the property of Routledge. Full article may be available at the publisher's website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02188790903092878]
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